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Credit scoring and mortgage securitization: do they lower mortgage rates?

  • Andrea Heuson
  • Wayne Passmore
  • Roger Sparks
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    This paper develops a model of the interactions between borrowers, originators, and a securitizer in primary and secondary mortgage markets. In the secondary market, the securitizer adds liquidity and plays a strategic game with mortgage originators. The securitizer sets the price at which it will purchase mortgages and the credit score standard that qualifies a mortgage for purchase. We investigate two potential links between securitization and mortgage rates. First, we analyze whether a portion of the liquidity premium gets passed on to borrowers in the form of a lower mortgage rate. Somewhat surpringly, we find plausible conditions under which securization fails to lower the mortgage rate. Secondly, and consistent with recent empirical results, we derive an inverse correlation between the volume of securitization and mortgage rates. However, the causation is reversed from the standard rendering. In our model, a decline in the mortgage rate causes increased securitization rather than the other way around.

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    Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series Finance and Economics Discussion Series with number 2000-44.

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    Date of creation: 2000
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2000-44
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    1. Black, Deborah G & Garbade, Kenneth D & Silber, William L, 1981. "The Impact of the GNMA Pass-through Program on FHA Mortgage Costs," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 36(2), pages 457-69, May.
    2. Oliver Jones, 1962. "The Development Of An Effective Secondary Mortgage Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 17(2), pages 358-370, 05.
    3. Wayne Passmore & Roger W. Sparks, 2000. "Automated Underwriting and the Profitability of Mortgage Securitization," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(2), pages 285-305.
    4. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    5. Arnoud W A Boot & Anjan V Thakor, 1992. "Security Design," CEPR Financial Markets Paper 0020, European Science Foundation Network in Financial Markets, c/o C.E.P.R, 77 Bastwick Street, London EC1V 3PZ..
    6. Merton, Robert C., 1987. "A simple model of capital market equilibrium with incomplete information," Working papers 1869-87., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    7. Kaufman, Herbert M, 1988. "FNMA's Role in Deregulated Markets: Implications from Past Behavior," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 20(4), pages 673-83, November.
    8. Charles W. Calomiris & Charles M. Kahn & Stanley D. Longhofer, 1994. "Housing-finance intervention and private incentives: helping minorities and the poor," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 634-678.
    9. Amihud, Yakov & Mendelson, Haim, 1986. "Asset pricing and the bid-ask spread," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 223-249, December.
    10. Pennacchi, George G, 1988. " Loan Sales and the Cost of Bank Capital," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(2), pages 375-96, June.
    11. Gorton, Gary & Pennacchi, George, 1990. " Financial Intermediaries and Liquidity Creation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(1), pages 49-71, March.
    12. Greenbaum, Stuart I. & Thakor, Anjan V., 1987. "Bank funding modes : Securitization versus deposits," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 379-401, September.
    13. Passmore, Wayne & Sparks, Roger, 1996. "Putting the Squeeze on a Market for Lemons: Government-Sponsored Mortgage Securitization," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 27-43, July.
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