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Are oil shocks inflationary? Asymmetric and nonlinear specifications versus changes in regime

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  • Mark A. Hooker

Abstract

This paper estimates the effects of oil price changes on U.S. inflation in a Phillips curve framework, allowing for some of the asymmetries, nonlinearities, and structural breaks that have been found in the literature on the real effects of oil price shocks. It finds that since around 1980, oil price changes seem to affect inflation only through their direct share in a price index, with little or no pass-through into core measures, while before 1980, oil shocks contributed substantially to core inflation. This structural-break characterization appears robust to a variety of respecifications and to fit the data better than asymmetric and nonlinear oil price alternatives. Preliminary evidence suggests that a change in the reaction of monetary policy to oil shocks is part of the explanation.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark A. Hooker, 1999. "Are oil shocks inflationary? Asymmetric and nonlinear specifications versus changes in regime," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1999-65, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:1999-65
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bos, Charles S. & Franses, Philip Hans & Ooms, Marius, 2002. "Inflation, forecast intervals and long memory regression models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 243-264.
    2. Andrzej Geise & Mariola Pilatowska, 2013. "Synchronization of Crude Oil Prices Cycle and Business Cycle for the Central Eastern European Economies," Dynamic Econometric Models, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, vol. 13, pages 175-194.
    3. C. Alan Garner, 2000. "An inflation report for 1999," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I, pages 5-20.
    4. Chang, Youngho & Wong, Joon Fong, 2003. "Oil price fluctuations and Singapore economy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(11), pages 1151-1165, September.
    5. Yukino Sakashita & Yasunori Yoshizaki, 2016. "The Effects of Oil Price Shocks on IIP and CPI in Emerging Countries," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-9, September.
    6. Amstad, Marlene & Hildebrand, Philipp, 2005. "The oil price and monetary policy – a new paradigm," MPRA Paper 15562, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ju, Keyi & Su, Bin & Zhou, Dequn & Wu, Junmin & Liu, Lifan, 2016. "Macroeconomic performance of oil price shocks: Outlier evidence from nineteen major oil-related countries/regions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 325-332.
    8. Owen F. Humpage & Eduard A. Pelz, 2002. "Do energy-price shocks affect core-price measures?," Working Paper 0215, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    9. Chuku, Chuku & Effiong, Ekpeno & Sam, Ndifreke, 2010. "Oil price distortions and their short- and long-run impacts on the Nigerian economy," MPRA Paper 24434, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    Petroleum industry and trade ; Inflation (Finance);

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