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The impact of e-business technologies on supply chain operations: a macroeconomic perspective

  • Amit Basu
  • Thomas F. Siems

New information technologies and e-business solutions have transformed supply chain operations from mass production to mass customization. This paper assesses the impact of these innovations on economic productivity, focusing on the macroeconomic benefits as supply chain operations have evolved from simple production and planning systems to today's real-time performance-management information systems using advanced e-business technologies. While many factors can influence macroeconomic variables, the impact of IT-enabled supply chains should not be overlooked. We find evidence that the impact of e-business technologies on supply chain operations have resulted in a reduced "bullwhip effect," lower inventory, reduced logistics costs, and streamlined procurement processes. These improvements, in turn, have likely helped to lower inflation, reduce economic volatility, strengthen productivity growth, and improve standards of living.

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File URL: http://www.dallasfed.org/assets/documents/research/papers/2004/wp0404.pdf
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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Working Papers with number 0404.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddwp:04-04
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  1. Gabriel Perez-Quiros & Margaret M. McConnell, 2000. "Output Fluctuations in the United States: What Has Changed since the Early 1980's?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1464-1476, December.
  2. W. Michael Cox & John V. Duca & Richard Alm, 2004. "Productivity gains showing up in services," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Nov, pages 1, 5-8.
  3. Evan F. Koenig & Thomas F. Siems & Mark A. Wynne, 2002. "New economy, new recession," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Mar, pages 11-16.
  4. Arthur M. Geoffrion & Ramayya Krishnan, 2003. "E-Business and Management Science: Mutual Impacts (Part 2 of 2)," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(11), pages 1445-1456, November.
  5. Martin Neil Baily, 2001. "Macroeconomic implications of the new economy," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 201-268.
  6. Hau L. Lee & V. Padmanabhan & Seungjin Whang, 1997. "Information Distortion in a Supply Chain: The Bullwhip Effect," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(4), pages 546-558, April.
  7. Martin Neil Baily, 2001. "Macroeconomic Implications of the New Economy," Working Paper Series WP01-9, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
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