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Capital goods trade, relative prices, and economic development

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Abstract

International trade in capital goods has quantitatively important effects on economic development through two channels: capital formation and aggregate TFP. We embed a multi country, multi sector Ricardian model of trade into a neoclassical growth framework. Our model matches several trade and development facts within a unified framework: the world distribution of capital goods production and trade, cross-country differences in investment rate and price of final goods, and cross-country equalization of price of capital goods. Reducing barriers to trade capital goods allows poor countries to access more efficient means of capital goods production abroad, leading to relatively higher capital output ratios. Meanwhile, poor countries can specialize more in their comparative advantage—non-capital goods production—and increase their TFP. The income gap between rich and poor countries declines by 40 percent by eliminating barriers to trade capital goods.

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  • Mutreja, Piyusha & Ravikumar, B. & Sposi, Michael J., 2016. "Capital goods trade, relative prices, and economic development," Globalization Institute Working Papers 294, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:294
    DOI: 10.24149/gwp294
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    Cited by:

    1. Da-Rocha, José-María & Restuccia, Diego & Tavares, Marina Mendes, 2019. "Firing costs, misallocation, and aggregate productivity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 60-81.
    2. repec:eee:inecon:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:67-81 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ravikumar, B. & Santacreu, Ana Maria & Sposi, Michael, 2019. "Capital accumulation and dynamic gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 93-110.
    4. Jeremy Greenwood & Juan Sanchez & Cheng Wang, 2013. "Quantifying the Impact of Financial Development on Economic Development," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(1), pages 194-215, January.
    5. repec:eee:dyncon:v:97:y:2018:i:c:p:19-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:phsmap:v:513:y:2019:i:c:p:418-423 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Grechyna, Daryna, 2018. "Firm size, bank size, and financial development," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 19-37.
    8. Alok Johri & Md Mahbubur Rahman, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of India's Relative Investment Price: A Tale of Policy Error and Reform," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-12, McMaster University, revised 03 Oct 2017.
    9. Anthony Landry, 2018. "Capital-Goods Imports and U.S. Growth," 2018 Meeting Papers 208, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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