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Quantitative Easing and Direct Lending in Response to the COVID-19 Crisis

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  • Filippo Occhino

Abstract

When the COVID-19 crisis hit the economy in 2020, the Federal Reserve responded with numerous programs designed to prevent a collapse in bank credit and firms’ available funds. I develop a dynamic general equilibrium model to study how these programs work and to evaluate their effectiveness. In the model, quantitative easing works through three channels: the expansion of bank reserves lowers a liquidity premium, the purchase of assets lowers a volatility risk premium, and the economic stimulus lowers a credit risk premium. Since bank reserves are currently larger than in the past, the liquidity premium channel is weaker, and quantitative easing is less effective. Direct lending to firms at a market rate is also less effective. Direct lending to firms at a subsidized rate can be more stimulative than quantitative easing, provided that it lowers firms’ marginal borrowing rate and user cost of capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Filippo Occhino, 2020. "Quantitative Easing and Direct Lending in Response to the COVID-19 Crisis," Working Papers 202029, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwq:88836
    DOI: 10.26509/frbc-wp-202029
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.26509/frbc-wp-202029
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Boyarchenko, Nina & Kovner, Anna & Shachar, Or, 2020. "It's what you say and what you buy: A holistic evaluation of the Corporate Credit Facilities," CEPR Discussion Papers 15432, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Christiane Baumeister & Luca Benati, 2013. "Unconventional Monetary Policy and the Great Recession: Estimating the Macroeconomic Effects of a Spread Compression at the Zero Lower Bound," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(2), pages 165-212, June.
    3. Mark Gertler & Peter Karadi, 2013. "QE 1 vs. 2 vs. 3. . . : A Framework for Analyzing Large-Scale Asset Purchases as a Monetary Policy Tool," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(1), pages 5-53, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Quantitative easing; credit easing; liquidity premium; risk premium; COVID-19;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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