IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedbwp/16-26.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Heterogeneous exporters: quantitative differences and qualitative similarities

Author

Listed:
  • Camila Casas
  • Federico J. Diez
  • Alejandra Gonzalez

Abstract

We combine two detailed datasets on Colombian manufacturing firms and document several stylized facts on exporter heterogeneity of total factor productivity (TFP) and export-market orientation, refining some previously known facts and unveiling some new others. We first show that the exporter productivity premium is remarkably robust across the methodologies used to recover TFP. We then document that the most productive exporters are those that export (1) a higher share of their total production, (2) to a larger number of countries, (3) to destinations less frequently reached by other exporters, (4) a larger number of products, and (5) with greater frequency and stability. In contrast, (6) the type of destination country or (7) the type of exported product has no significant effect on exporter productivity differences. These facts are robust to alternative definitions and specifications and can provide useful guidelines for policy makers.

Suggested Citation

  • Camila Casas & Federico J. Diez & Alejandra Gonzalez, 2017. "Heterogeneous exporters: quantitative differences and qualitative similarities," Working Papers 16-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbwp:16-26
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.bostonfed.org/publications/research-department-working-paper/2016/heterogeneous-exporters-qualitative-differences-and-qualitative-similarities.aspx
    File Function: Summary
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.bostonfed.org/-/media/Documents/Workingpapers/PDF/wp1626.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David A. Rivers, 2013. "Are Exporters More Productive than Non-Exporters?," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 20132, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    2. Nina Pavcnik, 2002. "Trade Liberalization, Exit, and Productivity Improvements: Evidence from Chilean Plants," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 245-276.
    3. Amit Gandhi & Salvador Navarro & David Rivers, 2011. "On the Identification of Production Functions: How Heterogeneous is Productivity?," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 20119, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    4. John Baldwin & Wulong Gu, 2009. "The Impact of Trade on Plant Scale, Production-Run Length and Diversification," NBER Chapters, in: Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data, pages 557-592, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Colin J. Hottman & Stephen J. Redding & David E. Weinstein, 2016. "Quantifying the Sources of Firm Heterogeneity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(3), pages 1291-1364.
    6. JaeBin Ahn & Alexander F. McQuoid, 2017. "Capacity Constrained Exporters: Identifying Increasing Marginal Cost," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1175-1191, July.
    7. Gonzague Vannoorenberghe & Zheng Wang & Zhihong Yu, 2014. "Volatility and Diversification of Exports: Firm-Level Theory and Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 4916, CESifo.
    8. John Baldwin & Wulong Gu, 2003. "Export-market participation and productivity performance in Canadian manufacturing," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(3), pages 634-657, August.
    9. Van Biesebroeck, Johannes, 2005. "Exporting raises productivity in sub-Saharan African manufacturing firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 373-391, December.
    10. Vannoorenberghe, Gonzague & Wang, Zheng & Yu, Zhihong, 2016. "Volatility and diversification of exports: Firm-level theory and evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 216-247.
    11. Camila Casas & Alejandra González, 2016. "Productivity Measures for the Colombian Manufacturing Industry," Borradores de Economia 947, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Juan Esteban Carranza & Jesús Antonio Bejarano Rojas & Camila Casas & Alejandra Ximena Gonzalez-Ramirez & Stefany Moreno-Burbano & Fernando Arias-Rodríguez & Juan Sebastián Vélez-Velásquez, 2018. "La industria colombiana en el siglo XXI," Revista ESPE - Ensayos sobre Política Económica, Banco de la Republica de Colombia, issue 87, pages 1-69, November.
    2. Xu, Jianwei & Du, Qingyuan & Wang, Yaqi, 2019. "Two-sided heterogeneity and exchange rate pass-through," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 1-1.
    3. Federico J. Diez & Jesse Mora & Alan C. Spearot, 2016. "Firms in international trade," Working Papers 16-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity premium; export intensity; export extensive margins;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedbwp:16-26. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbbous.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.