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Market imperfections

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  • Ramon P. DeGennaro

Abstract

Market imperfections affect virtually every transaction in some way, generating costs that interfere with trades that rational individuals make, or would make, in the absence of the imperfection. Understanding these costs gives us insight regarding the total costs of transactions, where to place them, or whether to make them at all. Market imperfections also generate profit opportunities for entrepreneurs who can reduce or eliminate them. Institutions or individuals who can lower costs tracing to imperfections have a competitive advantage and can earn economic rents until competing firms adapt. Imperfections can and do change over time, but they collectively never go to zero. Identifying and solving the underlying business problems linked to these imperfections remain an ongoing challenge and profit opportunity.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramon P. DeGennaro, 2005. "Market imperfections," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2005-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2005-12
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    Cited by:

    1. Balázs Égert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Transition Economies: Surveying the Surveyable," MNB Working Papers 2006/5, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    2. Filatotchev, Igor & Bell, R. Greg & Rasheed, Abdul A., 2016. "Globalization of Capital Markets: Implications for Firm Strategies," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 211-221.
    3. repec:taf:oaefxx:v:5:y:2017:i:1:p:1362184 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Fabrizio Coricelli & Bal??zs ??gert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Central & Eastern Europe: Gliding on a Wind of Change," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp850, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    5. Qingshuo Song & G. Yin & Chao Zhu, 2010. "Utility Maximization of an Indivisible Market with Transaction Costs," Papers 1003.2930, arXiv.org.
    6. Coricelli, Fabrizio & Égert, Balázs & MacDonald, Ronald, 2006. "Monetary transmission mechanism in Central and Eastern Europe : gliding on a wind of change," BOFIT Discussion Papers 8/2006, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    7. Fabrizio Coricelli & Balázs Égert & Ronald MacDonald, 2006. "Monetary Transmission in Central and Eastern Europe: Gliding on a Wind of Change," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 44-87.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G29 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Other

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