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An Empirical Analysis of the Public Spending Decomposition on Organized Crime

Author

Listed:
  • Maria Berrittella

    (Università degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche, Aziendali e Statistiche)

  • Carmelo Provenzano

    (Facoltà di Scienze Economiche e Giuridiche, Università Kore di Enna)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to investigate, empirically, what components of the public spending imply a decreasing effect on the organized crime and what components create opportunities for the organized crime, discussing also the role of government efficiency. The findings show a strikingly consistent pattern. Organized crime mainly operates in the distribution of the public spending for health, housing and community amenities. There is a decreasing effect on organized crime of the public expenditure devoted to education and to create morality values, such as the expenditure for recreation, culture and religion. Finally, government efficiency in public spending is beneficial for reducing the opportunities of the organized crime.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Berrittella & Carmelo Provenzano, 2016. "An Empirical Analysis of the Public Spending Decomposition on Organized Crime," Working Papers 2016.01, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2016.01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Chang, Juin-Jen & Lu, Huei-Chung & Wang, Ping, 2013. "Search for a theory of organized crimes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 130-153.
    3. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 1999. "Why Is There More Crime in Cities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 225-258, December.
    4. Barone, Guglielmo & Narciso, Gaia, 2015. "Organized crime and business subsidies: Where does the money go?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 98-110.
    5. Kollias, Christos & Mylonidis, Nikolaos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2013. "Crime and the effectiveness of public order spending in Greece: Policy implications of some persistent findings," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 121-133.
    6. Buonanno, Paolo & Montolio, Daniel, 2008. "Identifying the socio-economic and demographic determinants of crime across Spanish provinces," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 89-97, June.
    7. Yoram Ben-Porath, 1967. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 352-352.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government Efficiency; Organized Crime; Public Spending;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General

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