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Agglomeration Patterns in a Long Narrow Economy of a New Economic Geography Model: Analogy to a racetrack economy

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  • IKEDA Kiyohiro
  • MUROTA Kazuo
  • AKAMATSU Takashi
  • TAKAYAMA Yuki

Abstract

Narrow industrial belts comprising a system of cities are prospering worldwide. The self-organization of a system of cities in a long narrow economy of a new economic geography model is demonstrated through a comparative study with a racetrack economy, which is an idealized uniform trading space. A spatially repeated core-periphery pattern a la Christaller and Lösch emerges when agglomeration forces are large. Peripheral zones of this pattern are enlarged recursively to engender agglomeration shadow en route to an atomic mono-center. A megalopolis emerges when agglomeration forces are small.

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  • IKEDA Kiyohiro & MUROTA Kazuo & AKAMATSU Takashi & TAKAYAMA Yuki, 2016. "Agglomeration Patterns in a Long Narrow Economy of a New Economic Geography Model: Analogy to a racetrack economy," Discussion papers 16018, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:16018
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    Cited by:

    1. MORI Tomoya, 2018. "Spatial Pattern and City Size Distribution," Discussion papers 18053, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Kiyohiro Ikeda & Mikihisa Onda & Yuki Takayama, 2019. "Bifurcation Theory of a Racetrack Economy in a Spatial Economy Model," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 57-82, March.
    3. Yujiro Kawasaki & Kenmei Tsubota, 2019. "Myopic or farsighted: bilateral trade agreements among three symmetric countries," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 233-256, December.
    4. Ikeda, Kiyohiro & Onda, Mikihisa & Takayama, Yuki, 2018. "Spatial period doubling, invariant pattern, and break point in economic agglomeration in two dimensions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 129-152.
    5. Marcus Berliant & Tomoya Mori, 2017. "Beyond urban form: How Masahisa Fujita shapes us," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 13(1), pages 5-28, March.
    6. Yujing Zhao & Hong Leng & Pingjun Sun & Qing Yuan, 2018. "A Spatial Zoning Model of Municipal Administrative Areas Based on Major Function-Oriented Zones," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(9), pages 1-25, August.
    7. Takashi Akamatsu & Tomoya Mori & Yuki Takayama, 2015. "Agglomerations in a multi-region economy: Poly-centric versus mono-centric patterns," KIER Working Papers 929, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    8. Akamatsu, Takashi & Mori, Tomoya & Osawa, Minoru & Takayama, Yuki, 2017. "Spatial scale of agglomeration and dispersion: Theoretical foundations and empirical implications," MPRA Paper 80689, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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