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Does New Entry Drive Out Incumbents? Evidence from establishment-level data in Japan

  • ITO Keiko
  • KATO Masatoshi

Using establishment-level data in Japan, we examine the effects of new business entries on the probability of incumbents exiting the market. In particular, we estimate how the effects vary depending on the size of both the entrants and incumbents, which has not been explored in the literature. We find that while new business entries increase the probability that incumbents will exit, the effect differs significantly across sectors and depends on entrant and incumbent size. Although small establishments are the most likely to be driven out by new entries in all sectors, large incumbents are not always the most competitive, and, in the case of the tradable services sector, medium-sized establishments are the least likely to be affected by new entries. Moreover, our simple regression analysis shows a positive relationship between entry rates and employment growth in a region. New entries may promote resource reallocation and stimulate regional economies, possibly resulting in regional employment growth.

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Paper provided by Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) in its series Discussion papers with number 12034.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:12034
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  1. Parker,Simon C., 2009. "The Economics of Entrepreneurship," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521728355.
  2. Michael Fritsch & Oliver Falck & Udo Brixy, 2004. "The Effect of Industry, Region and Time on New Business Survival - A Multi-Dimensional Analysis," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2004-31, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
  3. Sierdjan Koster & André Stel & Mickey Folkeringa, 2012. "Start-ups as drivers of market mobility: an analysis at the region–sector level for The Netherlands," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 575-585, October.
  4. Geroski, P. A., 1995. "What do we know about entry?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 421-440, December.
  5. Niels Bosma & Erik Stam & Veronique Schutjens, 2011. "Creative destruction and regional productivity growth: evidence from the Dutch manufacturing and services industries," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 401-418, May.
  6. Neumark, David & Zhang, Junfu & Ciccarella, Stephen, 2008. "The effects of Wal-Mart on local labor markets," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 405-430, March.
  7. Mata, Jose & Portugal, Pedro & Guimaraes, Paulo, 1995. "The survival of new plants: Start-up conditions and post-entry evolution," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 459-481, December.
  8. Mitsuru Igami, 2011. "Does Big Drive Out Small?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 1-21, January.
  9. Michael Fritsch & Alexandra Schroeter, 2011. "Why does the effect of new business formation differ across regions?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 383-400, May.
  10. Mariko Sakakibara & Michael E. Porter, 2001. "Competing At Home To Win Abroad: Evidence From Japanese Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 310-322, May.
  11. Michael Fritsch, 2008. "How does new business formation affect regional development? Introduction to the special issue," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 1-14, January.
  12. Honjo, Yuji, 2000. "Business failure of new firms: an empirical analysis using a multiplicative hazards model," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 557-574, May.
  13. Mata, Jose & Portugal, Pedro, 1994. "Life Duration of New Firms," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 227-45, September.
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