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China, India, Brazil and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?

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  • Deepak Nayyar

Abstract

This paper attempts to analyse the economic implications of the rise of China, India, Brazil and South Africa, for developing countries situated in the wider context of the world economy. It examines the possible impact of their rapid growth on industrialized countries and developing countries, which could be complementary or competitive and, on balance, positive or negative. In doing so, it considers the main channels of transmission, to focus on international trade, investment, finance and migration. The essential question is whether, in times to come, these four countries could be the new engines of growth for the world economy. [Discussion Paper No. 2008/05]

Suggested Citation

  • Deepak Nayyar, 2010. "China, India, Brazil and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?," Working Papers id:3039, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3039
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deepak Nayyar, 2006. "Globalisation, history and development: a tale of two centuries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 137-159, January.
    2. Deepak Nayyar, 2008. "The Internationalization of Firms From India: Investment, Mergers and Acquisitions," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 111-131.
    3. D. Nayyar, 1996. "Free trade: why, when and for whom?," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 49(198), pages 333-350.
    4. Deepak Nayyar, 2008. "Learning to Unlearn from Development," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 259-280.
    5. D. Nayyar, 1996. "Free trade: why, when and for whom?," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 49(198), pages 333-350.
    6. Singh, Ajit., 2007. "Globalisation, industrial revolutions in India and China and labour markets in advanced countries : implications for national and international economic policy," ILO Working Papers 993979343402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Jenkins, Rhys & Peters, Enrique Dussel & Moreira, Mauricio Mesquita, 2008. "The Impact of China on Latin America and the Caribbean," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 235-253, February.
    8. Kaplinsky, Raphael & Morris, Mike, 2008. "Do the Asian Drivers Undermine Export-oriented Industrialization in SSA," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 254-273, February.
    9. World Bank, 2007. "World Development Indicators 2007," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 8150, December.
    10. Kaplinsky, Raphael & Messner, Dirk, 2008. "Introduction: The Impact of Asian Drivers on the Developing World," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 197-209, February.
    11. repec:ilo:ilowps:397934 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Robert Rowthorn, 2006. "The Renaissance Of China And India: Implications For The Advanced Economies," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 182, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kartik Misra, 2019. "Accumulation by Dispossession and Electoral Democracies : An Analysis of Land Acquisition for Special Economic Zones in India," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2019-16, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    2. Seema Joshi, 2011. "Two Competing Asian Giants," China Report, , vol. 47(3), pages 201-216, August.

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    Keywords

    China; India; Brazil; South Africa; growth; development; history; trade; investment; finance; migration;
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