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China, India, Brazil and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?

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  • Deepak Nayyar

Abstract

This paper attempts to analyse the economic implications of the rise of China, India, Brazil and South Africa, for developing countries situated in the wider context of the world economy. It examines the possible impact of their rapid growth on industrialized countries and developing countries, which could be complementary or competitive and, on balance, positive or negative. In doing so, it considers the main channels of transmission, to focus on international trade, investment, finance and migration. The essential question is whether, in times to come, these four countries could be the new engines of growth for the world economy. [Discussion Paper No. 2008/05]

Suggested Citation

  • Deepak Nayyar, 2010. "China, India, Brazil and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?," Working Papers id:3039, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3039
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Singh, Ajit., 2007. "Globalisation, industrial revolutions in India and China and labour markets in advanced countries : implications for national and international economic policy," ILO Working Papers 993979343402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. Jenkins, Rhys & Peters, Enrique Dussel & Moreira, Mauricio Mesquita, 2008. "The Impact of China on Latin America and the Caribbean," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 235-253, February.
    3. Deepak Nayyar, 2006. "Globalisation, history and development: a tale of two centuries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 137-159, January.
    4. Kaplinsky, Raphael & Messner, Dirk, 2008. "Introduction: The Impact of Asian Drivers on the Developing World," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 197-209, February.
    5. Kaplinsky, Raphael & Morris, Mike, 2008. "Do the Asian Drivers Undermine Export-oriented Industrialization in SSA," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 254-273, February.
    6. repec:ilo:ilowps:397934 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Deepak Nayyar, 2008. "The Internationalization of Firms From India: Investment, Mergers and Acquisitions," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 111-131.
    8. World Bank, 2007. "World Development Indicators 2007," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 8150.
    9. Robert Rowthorn, 2006. "The Renaissance Of China And India: Implications For The Advanced Economies," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 182, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    10. Deepak Nayyar, 2008. "Learning to Unlearn from Development," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 259-280.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; India; Brazil; South Africa; growth; development; history; trade; investment; finance; migration;

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