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Starting anew: Entrepreneurial intentions and realizations subsequent to business closure

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  • Veronique Schutjens
  • Erik Stam

Abstract

We know that most businesses fail. But what is not known is to what extent failed ex-entrepreneurs set up in business again. The objective of this article is to explore potential and realized serial entrepreneurship. Based on three disciplines - psychology, labour economics, and the sociology of careers - we formulated propositions to explain (potential) serial entrepreneurship. We tested these propositions empirically with a longitudinal database of 79 businesses that had closed within 5 years after start-up. A large majority of the ex-entrepreneurs maintained entrepreneurial intentions subsequent to business closure, while almost one in four business closures were followed by a new business (serial entrepreneurship). Our results show that the determinants of restart intention (potential serial entrepreneurship) and actual restart realization (realized serial entrepreneurship) are different. Ex-entrepreneurs who are young, who worked full-time in their prior business, and who recall their business management experience positively are likely to harbour restart intentions. Only 'being located in an urban region' transpired to have a significant effect on the start of a new business. Although entrepreneurial intentions are a necessary condition for the start of a new business, this study shows that the explanation of entrepreneurial intentions is distinct from the explanation of new business formation subsequent to business closure.

Suggested Citation

  • Veronique Schutjens & Erik Stam, 2006. "Starting anew: Entrepreneurial intentions and realizations subsequent to business closure," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-10, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:esi:egpdis:2006-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jolanda Hessels & Isabel Grilo & Roy Thurik & Peter Zwan, 2011. "Entrepreneurial exit and entrepreneurial engagement," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 447-471, August.
    2. repec:eee:jobuve:v:5:y:2016:i:c:p:9-13 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Welch, Catherine L. & Welch, Lawrence S., 2009. "Re-internationalisation: Exploration and conceptualisation," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 567-577, December.
    4. Cope, Jason, 2011. "Entrepreneurial learning from failure: An interpretative phenomenological analysis," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 604-623.
    5. Shepherd, Dean A. & Wiklund, Johan & Haynie, J. Michael, 2009. "Moving forward: Balancing the financial and emotional costs of business failure," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 134-148, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    serial entrepreneurship; business closure; entrepreneurial intentions; new business formation; The Netherlands;

    JEL classification:

    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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