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Differences Between Private Firms Owned by Novice, Serial and Portfolio Entrepreneurs: Implications for Policy Makers and Practitioners

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  • Paul Westhead
  • Deniz Ucbasaran
  • Mike Wright

Abstract

W ESTHEAD P., U CBASARAN D. and W RIGHT M. (2003) Differences between private firms owned by novice, serial and portfolio entrepreneurs: implications for policy makers and practitioners, Reg. Studies 37 , 187-200. Policy makers can target "hard' (i.e. financial) and "soft' (i.e. technical) assistance to firms. Some policy makers and practitioners are considering whether resources could be more effectively utilized if they were targeted towards habitual entrepreneurs, rather than in the form of additional initiatives to increase the pool of pure nascent entrepreneurs and novice entrepreneurs. To inform this policy debate, similarities and differences between 354 firms owned by novice, serial and portfolio entrepreneurs in Scotland are highlighted with regard to the process of financing businesses, organizational capabilities as well as the size and performance of the surveyed businesses. Presented empirical evidence confirms that portfolio entrepreneurs have more diverse experiences and more resources than either serial or novice entrepreneurs. On average, portfolio entrepreneurs appear to offer more attractive growth prospects than other entrepreneurs. A case for targeted support tailored to the aspirations and needs of portfolio (and serial) entrepreneurs is presented.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Westhead & Deniz Ucbasaran & Mike Wright, 2003. "Differences Between Private Firms Owned by Novice, Serial and Portfolio Entrepreneurs: Implications for Policy Makers and Practitioners," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 187-200.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:37:y:2003:i:2:p:187-200
    DOI: 10.1080/0034340022000057488
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rocha, Vera & Carneiro, Anabela & Amorim Varum, Celeste, 2015. "Serial entrepreneurship, learning by doing and self-selection," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 91-106.
    2. Simon Parker, 2014. "Who become serial and portfolio entrepreneurs?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 887-898, December.
    3. A. Amaral & Rui Baptista & Francisco Lima, 2011. "Serial entrepreneurship: impact of human capital on time to re-entry," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 1-21, July.
    4. McGaughey, Sara L., 2007. "Hidden ties in international new venturing: The case of portfolio entrepreneurship," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 307-321, September.
    5. Veronique Schutjens & Erik Stam, 2006. "Starting anew: Entrepreneurial intentions and realizations subsequent to business closure," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-10, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
    6. Gottschalk, Sandra & Greene, Francis J. & Höwer, Daniel & Müller, Bettina, 2014. "If you don't succeed, should you try again? The role of entrepreneurial experience in venture survival," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-009, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Weterings, Anet & Koster, Sierdjan, 2007. "Inheriting knowledge and sustaining relationships: What stimulates the innovative performance of small software firms in the Netherlands?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 320-335, April.
    8. Sergey Anokhin & Dietmar Grichnik & Robert D. Hisrich, 2008. "The Journey from Novice to Serial Entrepreneurship in China and Germany: Are the Drivers the Same?," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 6(2), pages 117-142.
    9. Andreas Koch & Thomas Stahlecker, 2004. "Firm Foundations in the Knowledge Intensive Business Service Sector. Results from a Comparative Empirical Study in Three German Regions," IAW Discussion Papers 17, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).
    10. J. Michael Haynie & Dean A. Shepherd & Jeffery S. McMullen, 2009. "An Opportunity for Me? The Role of Resources in Opportunity Evaluation Decisions," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 337-361, May.
    11. Ioannis Giotopoulos & Alexandra Kontolaimou & Aggelos Tsakanikas, 2017. "Drivers of high-quality entrepreneurship: what changes did the crisis bring about?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 913-930, April.
    12. Paul Robson & Charles Akuetteh & Paul Westhead & Mike Wright, 2012. "Innovative opportunity pursuit, human capital and business ownership experience in an emerging region: evidence from Ghana," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 603-625, October.
    13. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:2:p:487-497 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Sierdjan Koster, 2011. "Individual foundings and organizational foundings: their effect on employment growth in The Netherlands," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 485-501, May.
    15. Dawn DeTienne & Melissa Cardon, 2012. "Impact of founder experience on exit intentions," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 351-374, May.
    16. Parker, Simon C., 2013. "Do serial entrepreneurs run successively better-performing businesses?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 652-666.
    17. Ucbasaran, Deniz & Westhead, Paul & Wright, Mike & Flores, Manuel, 2010. "The nature of entrepreneurial experience, business failure and comparative optimism," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 541-555, November.

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