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Job loss and social capital: the role of family, friends and wider support networks

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  • Gush, Karon
  • Scott, James
  • Laurie, Heather

Abstract

Finding a new job is not the only problem the unemployed face. How to manage the loss of income, status and identity can also be a serious consideration for those in between jobs. In-depth qualitative interviews reveal that family, friends and wider networks are important mainstays in helping jobseekers back into work but in different ways and for a variety of reasons. By examining the job seeking strategies in terms of drawing on (a) family connections and (b) friends and wider social networks this investigation sheds some light on the extent to which social connectedness matters for jobseekers in contemporary Britain.

Suggested Citation

  • Gush, Karon & Scott, James & Laurie, Heather, 2015. "Job loss and social capital: the role of family, friends and wider support networks," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-07, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2015-07
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2015-07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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