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Social Interactions and the Labor Market

  • Yves Zenou

Pour mieux comprendre le rôle des réseaux sociaux sur le marché du travail, nous proposons deux modèles simples où les individus s’entraident dans leur recherche d’emploi. Dans le premier, l’information sur les emplois circule entre les individus en relation et nous montrons qu’il existe un équilibre de long terme avec regroupement des travailleurs de même statut puisque les salariés ont tendance à se lier à d’autres salariés plutôt qu’à des chômeurs. Dans le second modèle, les individus ont des liens qui peuvent être forts ou faibles et ils décident du temps qu’ils y consacreront. Comme dans Granovetter, ce modèle met l’accent sur l’intensité des liens faibles qui donnent accès à de nouvelles sources d’information sur l’offre d’emplois en créant une vague secondaire de contacts appartenant à des réseaux plus éloignés. Nous discutons ensuite les implications en termes de politique publique en montrant comment ces analyses permettent d’expliquer le chômage élevé des minorités ethniques.

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Article provided by Dalloz in its journal Revue d'économie politique.

Volume (Year): 123 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 307-331

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Handle: RePEc:cai:repdal:redp_233_0307
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  1. Michele Pellizzari, 2010. "Do Friends and Relatives Really Help in Getting a Good Job?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(3), pages 494-510, April.
  2. Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Thierry Verdier & Yves Zenouc, 2007. "Strong and Weak Ties in Employment and Crime," Post-Print halshs-00754247, HAL.
  3. Battu, Harminder & Mwale, McDonald & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Oppositional Identities and the Labor Market," Working Paper Series 649, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  4. Battu, Harminder & Seaman, Paul T & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Job Contact Networks and the Ethnic Minorities," CEPR Discussion Papers 5225, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Calvó-Armengol, Antoni & Zenou, Yves, 2001. "Job Matching, Social Network and Word-of-Mouth Communication," CEPR Discussion Papers 2797, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Selod, Harris & Zenou, Yves, 2004. "City Structure, Job Search, and Labor Discrimination. Theory and Policy Implications," Working Paper Series 620, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  7. Patrick Bayer & Stephen Ross & Giorgio Topa, 2005. "Place of Work and Place of Residence: Informal Hiring Networks and Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 11019, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Zenou, Yves, 2011. "Explaining the Black/White Employment Gap: The Role of Weak Ties," CEPR Discussion Papers 8582, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Fredrik Anderson & Simon Burgess & Julia Lane, 2009. "Do as the Neighbors Do: The Impact of Social Networks on Immigrant Employees," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/219, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  10. Scott A. Boorman, 1975. "A Combinatorial Optimization Model for Transmission of Job Information through Contact Networks," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 6(1), pages 216-249, Spring.
  11. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 1998. "Job Search Methods and Outcomes," Working Papers w199808, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  12. Wahba, Jackline & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Density, social networks and job search methods: Theory and application to Egypt," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 443-473, December.
  13. Damm, Anna Piil, 2006. "Ethnic Enclaves and Immigrant Labour Market Outcomes: Quasi-Experimental Evidence," Working Papers 06-4, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  14. Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1996. "How Effective Are State Employment Agencies? Jobcentre Use and Job Matching in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(3), pages 443-67, August.
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  16. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:118:y:2003:i:1:p:329-357 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Topa, Giorgio, 2001. "Social Interactions, Local Spillovers and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 261-95, April.
  18. Yannis M. Ioannides, 2012. "From Neighborhoods to Nations: The Economics of Social Interactions," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 9892.
  19. Holzer, Harry J, 1988. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, January.
  20. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1997. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," NBER Working Papers 5881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  23. Sergio Currarini & Matthew O. Jackson & Paolo Pin, 2009. "An Economic Model of Friendship: Homophily, Minorities, and Segregation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(4), pages 1003-1045, 07.
  24. Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2008. "The strength of weak ties in crime," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 209-236, February.
  25. Andersson, Fredrik & Burgess, Simon & Lane, Julia, 2009. "Do as the Neighbors Do: The Impact of Social Networks on Immigrant Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 4423, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  26. Edin, Per-Anders & Fredriksson, Peter & Åslund, Olof, 2000. "Ethnic enclaves and the economic success of immigrants - evidence from a natural experiment," Working Paper Series 2000:9, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  27. Sanjeev Goyal, 2007. "Introduction to Connections: An Introduction to the Economics of Networks
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    ," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
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