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Explaining cross-country differences in contact rates

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  • Blom, Annelies G.

Abstract

In the European Social Survey (ESS) contact rates differ across countries. These differences are broadly due to (1) differences in survey implementation, (2) differences in population characteristics associated with contact propensity and (3) differences in the association between 1 or 2 and contact propensity. This paper investigates correlates of contact within and across ESS countries by decomposing cross-country differences in predicted mean contact propensities into (population and fieldwork) characteristics effects, coefficients effects and a pseudo-interaction effect. The findings shed light on the cross-national comparability of the manipulable aspects of the contacting process. In addition, we distinguish factors explaining withincountry contact propensity from factors explaining cross-country differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Blom, Annelies G., 2009. "Explaining cross-country differences in contact rates," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-08, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2009-08
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2009-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yun, Myeong-Su, 2004. "Decomposing differences in the first moment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 275-280, February.
    2. Lynn, Peter & Clarke, Paul, 2001. "Separating refusal bias and non-contact bias: evidence from UK national surveys," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. William E. Even & David A. Macpherson, 1993. "The Decline of Private-Sector Unionism and the Gender Wage Gap," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(2), pages 279-296.
    4. Blom, Annelies G. & Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette, 2008. "Understanding cross-national differences in unit non-response: the role of contact data," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Edward C. Norton & Hua Wang & Chunrong Ai, 2004. "Computing interaction effects and standard errors in logit and probit models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 154-167, June.
    6. C. O'Muircheartaigh & P. Campanelli, 1999. "A multilevel exploration of the role of interviewers in survey non-response," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 162(3), pages 437-446.
    7. Nicoletti, Cheti & Buck, Nick, 2004. "Explaining interviewee contact and co-operation in the British and German Household Panels," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Blom, Annelies G., 2009. "Nonresponse bias adjustments: what can process data contribute?," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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