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Can in-work benefits improve social inclusion in the southern European countries?

  • Figari, Francesco

This paper analyses the effects of implementing a family-based and an individually-based in-work benefit in the Southern European Countries using EUROMOD, the EU-wide tax-benefit microsimulation model. In-Work Benefits (IWBs) are means-tested cash transfers given to individuals, through the tax system, conditional on their employment status. They are intended to enhance the incentives to accept work and redistribute resources to low income groups. The research confirms the presence of a trade off between the redistributive and the incentive effects of the different policies. Family-based in-work benefits are better targeted on the poorest households, in particular in Italy and Portugal. Individually-based policies lead to greater incentives to work, in particular in Italy and in Greece. Individually-based IWBs seem to be more efficient if the enhancement of the labour market participation of women in couples is of fundamental concern.

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File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/euromod/em4-09.pdf
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Paper provided by EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series EUROMOD Working Papers with number EM4/09.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 2009
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:emodwp:em4-09
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Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/euromod/
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  1. Nada Eissa & Hilary Hoynes, 2008. "Redistribution and Tax Expenditures: The Earned Income Tax Credit," NBER Working Papers 14307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Brewer, Mike & Duncan, Alan & Shephard, Andrew & Suarez, Maria Jose, 2006. "Did working families' tax credit work? The impact of in-work support on labour supply in Great Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 699-720, December.
  3. Marco Francesconi & Wilbert van der Klaauw, 2007. "The Socioeconomic Consequences of "In-Work" Benefit Reform for British Lone Mothers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
  4. Peter Haan & Michal Myck, 2006. "Apply with Caution: Introducing UK-Style In-work Support in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 555, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  5. R. V. Burkhauser & K. A. Couch & A. J. Glenn, . "Public policies for the working poor: The earned income tax credit versus minimum wage legislation," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1074-95, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  6. Owens, Jeffrey, 2006. "Fundamental Tax Reform: An International Perspective," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 59(1), pages 131-64, March.
  7. repec:ese:iserwp:2011-15 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Herwig Immervoll & Mark Pearson, 2009. "A Good Time for Making Work Pay? Taking Stock of In-Work Benefits and Related Measures across the OECD," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 81, OECD Publishing.
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