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GINI DP 51: In-Work Poverty

Author

Listed:
  • Ive Marx

    () (Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp)

  • Brian Nolan

    () (School of Applied Social Science, University College Dublin)

Abstract

While in-work poverty is not a new problem, the degree of attention it is receiving in Europe is more recent, reflecting at least two concurrent sources of concern (Andreβ and Lohmann 2008; OECD 2008; European Foundation 2010; Fraser et al. 2011; Crettaz 2011; European Commission 2011). Deindustrialisation, intensifying international trade and skill-biased technological change are said to be threatening if not effectively eroding the (potential) earnings and living standards of some workers in advanced economies. Yet at the same time, policy at EU level and in many countries has become focused on increasing the number of people relying on earnings, and particularly on drawing into the labour market those with the weakest education and work history profiles. The Europe 2020 target of boosting employment rates to 75 per cent of the population aged 20 to 64 shows this drive to be undiminished. Sharply increased unemployment in some countries following on from the onset of the economic crisis has only served to increase the emphasis on getting people into jobs. In light of these trends, there would appear to be legitimate concern that larger sections of the workforce are being expected to rely on jobs that do not generate sufficient income to escape poverty....

Suggested Citation

  • Ive Marx & Brian Nolan, 2012. "GINI DP 51: In-Work Poverty," GINI Discussion Papers 51, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aia:ginidp:51
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 2011. "Poverty and Deprivation in Europe," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199588435.
    2. Richard B. Freeman, 2007. "Labor Market Institutions Around the World," NBER Working Papers 13242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Hemerijck, Anton, 2012. "Changing Welfare States," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199607600.
    4. Figari, Francesco, 2009. "Can in-work benefits improve social inclusion in the southern European countries?," EUROMOD Working Papers EM4/09, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Henning Lohmann & Hans-Jürgen Andreß, 2008. "Explaining In-Work Poverty Within and Across Countries," Chapters, in: Hans-Jürgen Andreß & Henning Lohmann (ed.), The Working Poor in Europe, chapter 12, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Bargain, Olivier & Orsini, Kristian, 2006. "Beans for Breakfast? How Exportable Is the British Workfare Model?," IZA Discussion Papers 2025, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Peter Whiteford & Willem Adema, 2007. "What Works Best in Reducing Child Poverty: A Benefit or Work Strategy?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 51, OECD Publishing.
    8. Kenworthy, Lane, 2008. "Jobs with Equality," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199550609.
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    Cited by:

    1. Logue, Caitriona & Colgan, Brian & Callan, Tim, 2016. "Low Pay, Minimum Wages and Household Incomes: Evidence for Ireland," Papers BP2017/3, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    2. Martina Lubyová & Miroslav Štefánik & Pavol Baboš & Daniel Gerbery & Veronika Hvozdíková & Katarína Karasová & Ivan Lichner & Tomáš Miklošovic & Marek Radvanský & Eva Rublíková & Ivana Studená, . "Labour Market in Slovakia 2017+," Books, Institute of Economic Research, SAS, edition 1, number 003.
    3. Rense Nieuwenhuis & Laurie C. Maldonado, 2017. "Single-Parent Families and In-Work Poverty," LIS Working papers 687, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    4. Hector Ernesto Najera, 2017. "Does measurement invariance hold for the official Mexican multidimensional poverty measure? A state-level analysis 2012," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(3), pages 1217-1241, May.

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