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Output Composition of the Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism: Is Australia Different?

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  • Tuan Anh Phan

    () (Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University)

Abstract

This paper compares the output composition of the monetary policy transmission mechanism in Australia to those for the Euro area and the United States. Four Vector Autoregressive (VAR) models are used to estimate the contributions of private consumption and investment to output reactions resulting from nominal interest rate shocks for the period 1982Q3-2007Q4. The results suggest that the investment channel plays a more important role than the consumption channel in Australia, while the contributions of the two channels are indistinguishable in the Euro area and the U.S. The difference between Australia and the Euro area comes from differences in housing investment responses, whereas Australia is different to the U.S. mainly because it has a lower share of household consumption in total demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Tuan Anh Phan, 2014. "Output Composition of the Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism: Is Australia Different?," Crawford School Research Papers 1403, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:crwfrp:1403
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    Cited by:

    1. Kamal, Asmma, 2016. "Output Composition of Monetary Policy Transmission in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 78655, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 20 Apr 2017.
    2. Georgiadis, Georgios & Jančoková, Martina, 2017. "Financial globalisation, monetary policy spillovers and macro-modelling: tales from 1001 shocks," Working Paper Series 2082, European Central Bank.
    3. James Bishop & Peter Tulip, 2017. "Anticipatory Monetary Policy and the 'Price Puzzle'," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2017-02, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    4. Chuluunbayar, Delgerjargal, 2019. "Output Composition of Monetary Policy Transmission in Mongolia," MPRA Paper 98111, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Benjamin Beckers, 2020. "Credit Spreads, Monetary Policy and the Price Puzzle," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2020-01, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    6. Suranjit, K, 2016. "Output Decomposition and the Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism in Bangladesh: A Vector Autoregressive Approach," MPRA Paper 75495, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Nov 2016.
    7. Groenewold, Nicolaas, 2018. "Australia saved from the financial crisis by policy or by exports?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 118-135.
    8. Cross, Jamie, 2019. "On the reduced macroeconomic volatility of the Australian economy: Good policy or good luck?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 174-186.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment

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