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Output Decomposition and the Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism in Bangladesh: A Vector Autoregressive Approach

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  • Suranjit, K

Abstract

This paper investigates the output composition of the monetary policy transmission mechanism for Bangladesh. Vector Auto-regression (VAR) models are used to analyse the data from 1973 to 2015. Although the central bank’s policy interest rate shock does not significantly affect the major compositions of the output, investment channel still works better than consumption. However, exchange rate shock effects more significantly on the real economy mainly through consumption than investment. This research, on one hand, demonstrates the potential channels of the monetary policy transmission mechanism. On the other hand, methodologically, it proposes a minor modified model that suite for economy of the developing countries like Bangladesh where the net export component of output is negative which creates some complexity in using the standard model used for developed countries like the USA, the EU, Japan and Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Suranjit, K, 2016. "Output Decomposition and the Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism in Bangladesh: A Vector Autoregressive Approach," MPRA Paper 75495, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Nov 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:75495
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Kim, Soyoung & Roubini, Nouriel, 2000. "Exchange rate anomalies in the industrial countries: A solution with a structural VAR approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 561-586, June.
    3. Rokon Bhuiyan, 2013. "Inflationary expectations and monetary policy: evidence from Bangladesh," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 1155-1169, June.
    4. Boivin, Jean & Kiley, Michael T. & Mishkin, Frederic S., 2010. "How Has the Monetary Transmission Mechanism Evolved Over Time?," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 8, pages 369-422 Elsevier.
    5. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
    6. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-921, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Output Decomposition; VAR model; Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanism; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O42 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Monetary Growth Models

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