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Corruption and Fertility: Evidence from OECD countries

  • Eiji Yamamura

This paper uses panel data of OECD countries during the period 1995–2003 to examine how corruption affects fertility. The Corruption Perceptions Index is used to measure the degree of corruption. Fixed effects IV estimation and the Arellano-Bond dynamic panel estimation are employed to control for endogenous bias and unobservable country-specific effects. Results suggest that the fertility rate is higher in less corrupted countries. From this, the argument can be made that lack of political corruption underlies desirable conditions for child rearing in developed countries.

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Paper provided by Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels in its series EERI Research Paper Series with number EERI_RP_2011_03.

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Date of creation: 03 Mar 2011
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Handle: RePEc:eei:rpaper:eeri_rp_2011_03
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  1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, May.
  2. Aidt, Toke & Dutta, Jayasri & Sena, Vania, 2008. "Governance regimes, corruption and growth: Theory and evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 195-220, June.
  3. Rainald Borck, 2007. "Federalism, Fertility and Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 2167, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. David De La Croix & Clara Delavallade, 2008. "Growth, public investment and corruption with failing institutions," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00129741, HAL.
  5. Galor, Oded & Weil, David N, 1996. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 374-87, June.
  6. Del Monte, Alfredo & Papagni, Erasmo, 2001. "Public expenditure, corruption, and economic growth: the case of Italy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, March.
  7. Andreas Bergh & Christian Bjørnskov, 2011. "Historical Trust Levels Predict the Current Size of the Welfare State," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 1-19, 02.
  8. Philip Shaw & Marina-Selini Katsaiti & Marius Jurgilas, 2006. "Corruption and Growth Under Weak Identification," Working papers 2006-17, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2007.
  9. Arellano, Manuel, 2003. "Panel Data Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199245291.
  10. Das Gupta, Monica, 1999. "Liberte, egalite, fraternite : exploring the role of governance in fertility decline," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2126, The World Bank.
  11. Jie Zhang & Junsen Zhang, 2005. "The Effect of Life Expectancy on Fertility, Saving, Schooling and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(1), pages 45-66, 03.
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