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Wealth of the Nation: Scotland's Productivity Challenge - Technical Appendix

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Abstract

This note provides technical background information on some contents of the report Wealth of the Nation: Scotland's Productivity Challenge (Kelly et al.,2018). The report shows that Scotland's productivity performance is only middling in the OECD: Scotland would need to close a productivity gap of 20% to reach the top quartile of most productive OECD countries. It also illustrates that this gap can be attributed to a relatively low capital stock and low Total Factor Productivity (TFP) in equal measure. In this note, we make transparent the data and assumptions underlying these calculations.

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  • Mark Mitchell & Robert Zymek, 2018. "Wealth of the Nation: Scotland's Productivity Challenge - Technical Appendix," Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 289, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
  • Handle: RePEc:edn:esedps:289
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    input-output; development accounting; productivity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E01 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth; Environmental Accounts
    • F40 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - General
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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