IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/edj/ceauch/315.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Financial Openness, Domestic Financial Development and Credit Ratings

Author

Listed:
  • Eugenia Andreasen
  • Patricio Valenzuela

    ()

Abstract

This paper shows that financial openness significantly affects corporate and sovereign credit ratings, and that the magnitude of this effect depends on the level of development of the domestic financial market. Issuers located in less financially developed economies stand to benefit the most from opening up their capital accounts, whereas the impact of this effect decreases as the level of development of the domestic capital market improves. JEL classification: F34; G15; G38.

Suggested Citation

  • Eugenia Andreasen & Patricio Valenzuela, 2015. "Financial Openness, Domestic Financial Development and Credit Ratings," Documentos de Trabajo 315, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:edj:ceauch:315
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.dii.uchile.cl/~cea/sitedev/cea/www/download.php?file=documentos_trabajo/ASOCFILE120150619115258.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey, 2000. "Foreign Speculators and Emerging Equity Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 565-613, April.
    2. Baltagi, Badi H. & Demetriades, Panicos O. & Law, Siong Hook, 2009. "Financial development and openness: Evidence from panel data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 285-296, July.
    3. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
    4. Gelos, R. Gaston & Sahay, Ratna & Sandleris, Guido, 2011. "Sovereign borrowing by developing countries: What determines market access?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 243-254, March.
    5. Sofia Bauducco & Alexandre Janiak, 2012. "Minimum wages strike back: the effects on capital and labor demands in a large-firm framework," Documentos de Trabajo 287, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    6. Luc Laeven, 2014. "The Development of Local Capital Markets; Rationale and Challenges," IMF Working Papers 14/234, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Anusha Chari & Peter Blair Henry, 2004. "Risk Sharing and Asset Prices: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1295-1324, June.
    8. Fischer, Ronald & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2013. "Financial openness, market structure and private credit: An empirical investigation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 478-481.
    9. Denzler, Stefan M. & Dacorogna, Michel M. & Muller, Ulrich A. & McNeil, Alexander J., 2006. "From default probabilities to credit spreads: Credit risk models do explain market prices," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 79-95, June.
    10. Eduardo Engel & Ronald Fischer & Alexander Galetovic & Manuel Hermosilla, 2009. "Renegociación de concesiones en Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 262, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    11. Darren J. Kisgen & Philip E. Strahan, 2010. "Do Regulations Based on Credit Ratings Affect a Firm's Cost of Capital?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(12), pages 4324-4347, December.
    12. Matteo Triossi & Patricio Valdivieso & Benjamín Villena-Roldán, 2013. "A Spatial Model of Voting with Endogenous Proposals: Theory and Evidence from Chilean Senate," Documentos de Trabajo 294, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    13. Jonathan David Ostry & Alessandro Prati & Antonio Spilimbergo, 2009. "Structural Reforms and Economic Performance in Advanced and Developing Countries," IMF Occasional Papers 268, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Felipe Balmaceda & Ronald Fischer, 2010. "Economic performance, creditor protection, and labour inflexibility," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(3), pages 553-577, July.
    15. Prati, Alessandro & Schindler, Martin & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2012. "Who benefits from capital account liberalization? Evidence from firm-level credit ratings data," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1649-1673.
    16. Fischer, Ronald & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2013. "Financial openness, market structure and private credit: An empirical investigation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 478-481.
    17. Borensztein, Eduardo & Cowan, Kevin & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2013. "Sovereign ceilings “lite”? The impact of sovereign ratings on corporate ratings," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4014-4024.
    18. Constantin Mellios & Eric Paget-Blanc, 2006. "Which factors determine sovereign credit ratings?," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 361-377.
    19. Andreasen, Eugenia & Schindler, Martin & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2015. "Capital Controls and the Cost of Debt," Working Papers 15-02, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    20. Richard Cantor & Frank Packer, 1996. "Determinants and impact of sovereign credit ratings," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Oct, pages 37-53.
    21. Darren J. Kisgen, 2006. "Credit Ratings and Capital Structure," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(3), pages 1035-1072, June.
    22. Matteo Triossi, 2014. "Assessing the extent of democratic failures. A 99%-Condorcet’s Jury Theorem," Documentos de Trabajo 306, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ben Hmiden, Oussama & Ben Cheikh, Nidhaleddine, 2016. "Debt-threshold effect in sovereign credit ratings: New evidence from nonlinear panel smooth transition models," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 273-278.
    2. Gkillas (Gillas), Konstantinos & Tsagkanos, Athanasios & Siriopoulos, Costas, 2016. "The risk in capital controls," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 261-266.
    3. repec:eee:glofin:v:36:y:2018:i:c:p:1-13 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Credit risk; Financial development; Financial liberalization;

    JEL classification:

    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:edj:ceauch:315. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ceuclcl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.