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The Economic Impact of Globalization in Asia-Pacific - The Case of The Flying Geese

  • Christer Ljungwall

    (China Center for Economic Research)

  • Örjan Sjöberg
Registered author(s):

    In Pacific Asia, globalization has resulted in rapidly growing international flows of goods, portfolio capital, and direct investments. At the same time, several countries shift from a command to market economy. Against this background, we analyze the perhaps most popular model used to depict the process of economic integration and development in Pacific Asia, the flying geese pattern of shifting comparative advantage. Our point of departure is that economic and other social processes are best understood in relation to one another. We confine ourselves to intraregional patterns of trade and investment but locate them within the broader framework of global trends.

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    File URL: http://130.56.61.71/node/22711
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    Paper provided by East Asian Bureau of Economic Research in its series Development Economics Working Papers with number 22711.

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    Date of creation: Jan 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22711
    Contact details of provider: Postal: JG Crawford Building #13, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, Australian National University, ACT 0200
    Web page: http://www.eaber.org

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    1. Nicholas Crafts & Anthony Venables, 2003. "Globalization in History.A Geographical Perspective," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 323-370 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650592, June.
    3. Peter Drysdale & Sébastien Willis, 2013. "Asia and The G20," EABER Working Papers 23384, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    4. Wen, Mei, 2004. "Relocation and agglomeration of Chinese industry," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 329-347, February.
    5. C. Fred Bergsten, 1997. "Open Regionalism," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(5), pages 545-565, 08.
    6. Greenaway, David & Morgan, Wyn & Wright, Peter, 2002. "Trade liberalisation and growth in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 229-244, February.
    7. Cumings, Bruce, 1984. "The origins and development of the Northeast Asian political economy: industrial sectors, product cycles, and political consequences," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(01), pages 1-40, December.
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