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The Importance of Fertility Norms: New Evidence from France

  • Bastien CHABE-FERRET

    ()

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

I enrich the findings according to which cultural proxies such as past total fertility rates in the country of origin or number of siblings have a sizable effect on the fertility choice of second generation migrants. I use the TeO survey that interviewed individuals established in France from different origins to investigate whether the effect of fertility norms fades away with assimilation in the host country. In particular I find that women who are in a relationship with a non-native, who were born to two migrant parents and whose family has settled in France more recently are more sensitive to the norm. Still, a significant effect of past fertility rates resists the introduction of many controls like characteristics of partners and religion, though with a smaller magnitude. Finally, by using a duration model, I document that the fertility norm has a positive effect on the hazard rate to have a third child but not for previous birth orders, which suggests some other determinants of fertility dominate for earlier births.

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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 2013012.

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Length: 27
Date of creation: 17 May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2013012
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  1. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-77, June.
  2. Alessandra Fogli & Raquel Fernandez, 2009. "Culture: An Empirical Investigation of Beliefs, Work, and Fertility," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 146-77, January.
  3. Lionel Artige & Carmen Camacho & David De La Croix, 2004. "Wealth Breeds Decline: Reversals of Leadership and Consumption Habits," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 423-449, December.
  4. Alfonso Miranda, 2013. "A double-hurdle count model for completed fertility data from the developing world," Mexican Stata Users' Group Meetings 2013 13, Stata Users Group.
  5. Thomas Baudin, 2008. "Religion and fertility : the French connection," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne v08089, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  6. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn & Albert Yung-Hsu Liu & Kerry L. Papps, 2008. "The Transmission of Women's Fertility, Human Capital and Work Orientation Across Immigrant Generations," NBER Working Papers 14388, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Eliana La Ferrara & Alberto Chong & Suzanne Duryea, 2012. "Soap Operas and Fertility: Evidence from Brazil," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 1-31, October.
  8. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Fertility Theories: Can They Explain the Negative Fertility-Income Relationship?," NBER Chapters, in: Demography and the Economy, pages 43-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. George Hondroyiannis, 2010. "Fertility Determinants and Economic Uncertainty: An Assessment Using European Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-50, March.
  10. Munshi, Kaivan & Myaux, Jacques, 2006. "Social norms and the fertility transition," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 1-38, June.
  11. Evelyn L. Lehrer, 2004. "Religion as a Determinant of Economic and Demographic Behavior in the United States," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(4), pages 707-726.
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