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Television and Contraceptive Use – Panel Evidence from Rural Indonesia

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  • Peters, Jörg
  • Strupat, Christoph
  • Vance, Colin

Abstract

In recent years, rural electrification and access to television have spread rapidly throughout the developing world. The values and cultural norms embodied in television programming have potentially profound implications for infl uencing behavior, particularly as regards reproductive decisions. Using household panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS), this paper explores the eff ect of television ownership on the use of modern contraceptives in rural Indonesia. Although results from a pooled regression suggest a statistically signifi cant and positive relationship between contraceptive use and television ownership, this fi nding is not robust to fixed effects estimates that control for time-invariant unobserved characteristics. By contrast, several other individual and community-level determinants, most notably the presence of midwives and health services, are statistically significant in the fixed effects model. We conclude that the growing corpus of cross-sectional evidence on a link between television and contraception should be interpreted cautiously.

Suggested Citation

  • Peters, Jörg & Strupat, Christoph & Vance, Colin, 2012. "Television and Contraceptive Use – Panel Evidence from Rural Indonesia," Ruhr Economic Papers 365, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:365
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Jonathan Skinner & Douglas Staiger, 2007. "Technology Adoption from Hybrid Corn to Beta-Blockers," NBER Chapters,in: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches, pages 545-570 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    contraceptive use; television; fertility; technology adoption; rural development;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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