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Job matching quality effects of employment promotion measures for people with disabilities


  • Malo, Miguel A.
  • Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando


In this article, we evaluate the influence that employment promotion measures designed for disabled people have on the latter's job matching quality through the use of matching analysis. We focus on two aspects of quality: the type of contract held (either permanent or temporary) and whether or not the individual is searching for another job. We find that employment promotion measures do not improve the match's job quality. Furthermore, the use of specialized labour market intermediation services by disabled individuals does not affect their job matching quality. As an additional contribution, our definition of disability eludes the self-justification bias.

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  • Malo, Miguel A. & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2005. "Job matching quality effects of employment promotion measures for people with disabilities," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb055315, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:wbrepe:wb055315

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