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Does Public-Sector Employment Fully Crowd Out Private-Sector Employment?

Author

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  • Alberto Behar
  • Junghwan Mok

Abstract

We quantify the extent to which public-sector employment crowds out private-sector employment using specially assembled datasets for a large cross-section of developing and advanced countries. Regressions of either private-sector employment rates or unemployment rates on two measures of public-sector employment point to full crowding out. This means that high rates of public employment, which incur substantial fiscal costs, have a large negative impact on private employment rates and do not reduce overall unemployment rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Behar & Junghwan Mok, 2013. "Does Public-Sector Employment Fully Crowd Out Private-Sector Employment?," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-20, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2013-20
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    File URL: http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/csae-wps-2013-20.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Vegh, Carlos A. & Vuletin, Guillermo, 2013. "On graduation from fiscal procyclicality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 32-47.
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    6. Lorenzo E Bernal-Verdugo & Davide Furceri & Dominique Guillaume, 2012. "Labor Market Flexibility and Unemployment: New Empirical Evidence of Static and Dynamic Effects," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(2), pages 251-273, June.
    7. Raphael Espinoza, 2012. "Government Spending, Subsidies and Economic Efficiency in the GCC," OxCarre Working Papers 095, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    8. Richard Freeman, 2005. "Labour market institutions without blinders: The debate over flexibility and labour market performance," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 129-145.
    9. Horst Feldmann, 2010. "Government size and unemployment in developing countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 289-292, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Gomes & Zoe Kuehn, 2017. "Human capital and the size distribution of firms," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 26, pages 164-179, October.
    2. Jelena Nikolic & Ivica Rubil & Iva Tomic, 2014. "Changes in Public and Private Sector Pay Structures in Two Emerging Market Economies during the Crisis," Working Papers 1403, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb.
    3. Javier J. Perez & Ana Lamo & Enrique Moral-Benito, 2015. "Does Slack Influence Public and Private Labor Market," EcoMod2015 8792, EcoMod.
    4. Ana Lamo & Enrique Moral-Benito & Javier J. Pérez, 2016. "Does slack influence public and private labour market interactions?," Working Papers 1605, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    5. Pedro Gomes & Zoe Kuehn, 2017. "Human capital and the size distribution of firms," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 26, pages 164-179, October.
    6. Ara Stepanyan & Lamin Y Leigh, 2015. "Fiscal Policy Implications for Labor Market Outcomes in Middle-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 15/17, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Bruno Coquet, 2016. "Secteur Public : l'assurance chômage qui n'existe pas," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/7ag1gjr51l8, Sciences Po.
    8. International Monetary Fund, 2015. "Kuwait; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 15/328, International Monetary Fund.
    9. World Bank, 2016. "Public Employment and Governance in Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25181, The World Bank.
    10. Reda Cherif & Fuad Hasanov, 2014. "Soaring of the Gulf Falcons; Diversification in the GCC Oil Exporters in Seven Propositions," IMF Working Papers 14/177, International Monetary Fund.
    11. International Monetary Fund, 2015. "Saudi Arabia; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 15/286, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Alberto Behar, 2015. "Comparing the Employment-Output Elasticities of Expatriates and Nationals in the Gulf Cooperation Council," IMF Working Papers 15/191, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Alberto Behar & Armand Fouejieu, 2016. "External Adjustment in Oil Exporters; The Role of Fiscal Policy and the Exchange Rate," IMF Working Papers 16/107, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; Crowding out;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • H59 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Other

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