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University patenting and scientific productivity. A quantitative study of Italian academic inventors

Author

Listed:
  • Stefano Breschi

    (Cespri, Bocconi University, Milano, Italy.)

  • Francesco Lissoni

    (Cespri, Bocconi University, Milano; Università degli studi di Brescia, Italy.)

  • Fabio Montobbio

    (Cespri, Bocconi University, Milano; Università degli studi dell’Insubria, Varese,Italy.)

Abstract

Based on longitudinal data for a matched sample of 592 Italian academic inventors and controls, the paper explores the impact of patenting on university professors’ scientific productivity, as measured by publication and citation counts. Academic inventors (university professors who appear as designated inventors on at least one patent application) publish more and better quality papers than their colleagues with no patents, and increase their productivity after patenting. Endogeneity problems are addressed using instrumental variables and applying inverse probability of treatment weights. The beneficial effect of patenting on publication rates last longer for academic inventors with more than one patent.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano Breschi & Francesco Lissoni & Fabio Montobbio, 2006. "University patenting and scientific productivity. A quantitative study of Italian academic inventors," KITeS Working Papers 189, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Nov 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:cri:cespri:wp189
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    File URL: ftp://ftp.unibocconi.it/pub/RePEc/cri/papers/WP189BreschiLissoniMontobbio.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hausman, Jerry & Hall, Bronwyn H & Griliches, Zvi, 1984. "Econometric Models for Count Data with an Application to the Patents-R&D Relationship," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(4), pages 909-938, July.
    2. James Adams & Zvi Griliches, 1996. "Measuring Science: An Exploration," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1749, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Buenstorf, Guido, 2009. "Is commercialization good or bad for science? Individual-level evidence from the Max Planck Society," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 281-292, March.
    2. Banal-Estañol, Albert & Jofre-Bonet, Mireia & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "The double-edged sword of industry collaboration: Evidence from engineering academics in the UK," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(6), pages 1160-1175.
    3. Giuliani, Elisa & Morrison, Andrea & Pietrobelli, Carlo & Rabellotti, Roberta, 2010. "Who are the researchers that are collaborating with industry? An analysis of the wine sectors in Chile, South Africa and Italy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 748-761, July.
    4. Lawson Cornelia & Sterzi Valerio, 2012. "The role of early career factors in academic patenting," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis LEI & BRICK - Laboratory of Economics of Innovation "Franco Momigliano", Bureau of Research in Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge, Collegio 201201, University of Turin.
    5. Fini, Riccardo & Grimaldi, Rosa & Santoni, Simone & Sobrero, Maurizio, 2011. "Complements or substitutes? The role of universities and local context in supporting the creation of academic spin-offs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1113-1127, October.
    6. Goldfarb, Brent, 2008. "The effect of government contracting on academic research: Does the source of funding affect scientific output," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 41-58, February.
    7. Banal-Estanol, A. & Jofre-Bonet, M. & Meissner, C., 2008. "The Impact of Industry Collaboration on Academic Research Output: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers 08/14, Department of Economics, City University London.
    8. Dirk Czarnitzki & Katrin Hussinger & Cédric Schneider, 2011. "Commercializing academic research: the quality of faculty patenting," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(5), pages 1403-1437, October.
    9. Albert Banal-Estañol & Inés Macho-Stadler & David Pérez-Castrillo, 2011. "Research output from university-industry collaborative projects," Working Papers 2011/23, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    10. Mario Calderini & Chiara Franzoni & Andrea Vezzulli, 2007. "The Unequal Benefits of Academic Patenting for Science and Engineering Research," KITeS Working Papers 203, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Oct 2007.
    11. Guido Buenstorf & Matthias Geissler, 2012. "Not invented here: technology licensing, knowledge transfer and innovation based on public research," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 481-511, July.
    12. Michele Pezzoni & Francesco Lissoni & Gianluca Tarasconi, 2014. "How to kill inventors: testing the Massacrator© algorithm for inventor disambiguation," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 101(1), pages 477-504, October.
    13. Jerry Thursby & Marie Thursby, 2010. "University Licensing: Harnessing or Tarnishing Faculty Research?," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 10, pages 159-189 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Breschi, Stefano & Catalini, Christian, 2010. "Tracing the links between science and technology: An exploratory analysis of scientists' and inventors' networks," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 14-26, February.
    15. Malwina Mejer, 2011. "Entrepreneurial Scientists and their Publication Performance. An Insight from Belgium," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2011-017, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    16. Czarnitzki, Dirk & Glänzel, Wolfgang & Hussinger, Katrin, 2009. "Heterogeneity of patenting activity and its implications for scientific research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 26-34, February.
    17. Crespi, Gustavo & D'Este, Pablo & Fontana, Roberto & Geuna, Aldo, 2011. "The impact of academic patenting on university research and its transfer," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 55-68, February.
    18. Serkan Atmaca, 2011. "Patents from the Academe: A Methodology Research for the Analysis of University Patents and Preliminary Findings for Turkey," STPS Working Papers 1101, STPS - Science and Technology Policy Studies Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2011.
    19. Landry, Réjean & Saïhi, Malek & Amara, Nabil & Ouimet, Mathieu, 2010. "Evidence on how academics manage their portfolio of knowledge transfer activities," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1387-1403, December.
    20. Albert Banal-Estañol & Mireia Jofre-Bonet & Cornelia Meissner, 2008. "Theimpact of industry collaboration on research: Evidence from engineering academics in the UK," Economics Working Papers 1190, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Aug 2010.
    21. Alexander Schacht, 2012. "Commercializing inventions from public research: Does speed matter?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-026, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    scientific productivity; university patents; technology transfer.;

    JEL classification:

    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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