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Trade in a 'Green Growth' Development Strategy: Issues and Challenges

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  • de Melo, Jaime

Abstract

This paper discusses the state of knowledge about the trade-related environmental consequences of a country’s development strategy along three channels: (i) direct trade-environment linkages (overexploitation of natural resources and trade-related transport costs);(ii) ‘virtual trade’ in emissions resulting from production activities; (iii) the product mix attributes of a ‘green-growth’ strategy (environmentally preferable products and goods for environmental management). Main conclusions are the following. Trade exacerbates over-exploitation of natural resources in weak institutional environments, but there is little evidence that differences in environmental policies across countries has led to significant ‘pollution havens’. Trade policies to ‘level the playing field’ would be ineffective and result in destructive conflicts in the WTO. Lack of progress at the Doha round suggests the need to modify the current system of global policy making.

Suggested Citation

  • de Melo, Jaime, 2013. "Trade in a 'Green Growth' Development Strategy: Issues and Challenges," CEPR Discussion Papers 9660, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9660
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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Gallegos David, 2017. "Managed Trade and Environmental Policy under Imperfect Competition," Remef - Revista Mexicana de Economía y Finanzas Nueva Época REMEF (The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance), Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas, IMEF, vol. 12(3), pages 29-44, Julio-Sep.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental goods; green growth; natural resources; trade and climate;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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