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Trade and Renewable Resources in a Second Best World: An Overview

  • Erwin Bulte


  • Edward Barbier

We provide an overview and introduction to the emerging field of trade and renewable resources, and discuss the potential impact of trade liberalization on welfare and resource conservation. A key factor determining the effect of trade reform is the institutional context or property rights regime, and our survey is organized such that it loosely follows the development of new insights with respect to institutions in this literature. This implies a transition from the benevolent planner’s model to the polar opposite benchmark of open access in the 1990s. Currently the pendulum is swinging back towards management and regulation, but institutions are treated as endogenous. We discuss and compare various key models in some detail and search for common ground between protagonists and antagonists of free trade. Copyright Springer 2005

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Article provided by European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in its journal Environmental & Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 (04)
Pages: 423-463

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Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:30:y:2005:i:4:p:423-463
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