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Job Characteristics and Labor Turnover: Assessing the Role of Preferences and Opportunities in Teacher Mobility

Author

Listed:
  • Bonhomme, Stéphane
  • Jolivet, Grégory
  • Leuven, Edwin

Abstract

Job characteristics can affect worker turnover through their effect on utility and through their effect on outside job opportunities. We separately identify and estimate the roles of these two channels. Our method exploits information on job changes and relies on an augmented sample selection correction. Taking our approach to an exhaustive register of Dutch primary school teachers, and using arguably plausible exclusion restrictions, we show a detailed picture of preferences for school characteristics. We also study how preference estimates may be biased when ignoring information on job opportunities and discuss the implications for the analysis of teacher turnover.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonhomme, Stéphane & Jolivet, Grégory & Leuven, Edwin, 2012. "Job Characteristics and Labor Turnover: Assessing the Role of Preferences and Opportunities in Teacher Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 8841, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8841
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Michela Tincani, 2014. "School Vouchers and the Joint Sorting of Students and Teachers," Working Papers 2014-012, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    compensating differentials; labour turnover; sample selection; teaching labour markets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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