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Exposure to External Country Specific Shocks and Income Volatility

  • Jansen, Marion
  • Lennon, Carolina
  • Piermartini, Roberta

Using a dataset of 104 countries over a period from 1966 to 2004, this paper analyses the relevance of country specific shocks for income volatility in open economies. We show that exposure to country specific shocks has a positive and significant impact on GDP volatility. In particular, we find that the degree to which the cycles of different trading partners are correlated is more important in explaining exporters’ GDP volatility than the volatility of demand in individual export market. We also show that geographical diversification is a significant determinant of countries' exposure to country specific shocks.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 7123.

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Date of creation: Jan 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7123
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