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Participation Games: Market Entry, Coordination and the Beautiful Blonde

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  • Anderson, Simon P
  • Engers, Maxim

Abstract

We find the Nash equilibria for monotone n-player symmetric games where each player chooses whether to participate. Examples include market entry games, coordination games, and the bar-room game depicted in the movie 'A Beautiful Mind'. The symmetric Nash equilibrium involves excessive participation (a common property resource problem) if participants’ payoffs are decreasing (in the number of participants), and insufficient participation if payoffs are increasing. With decreasing payoffs there can be many equilibria, but with increasing payoffs there are only three. Some comparative static properties of changing one player’s participation payoffs are counter-intuitive, especially with more than two players.

Suggested Citation

  • Anderson, Simon P & Engers, Maxim, 2005. "Participation Games: Market Entry, Coordination and the Beautiful Blonde," CEPR Discussion Papers 5241, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:5241
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Anderson, Simon P. & Goeree, Jacob K. & Holt, Charles A., 2001. "Minimum-Effort Coordination Games: Stochastic Potential and Logit Equilibrium," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 177-199, February.
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    7. Vickrey, William S. & Anderson, Simon P. & Braid, Ralph M., 1999. "Spatial competition, monopolistic competition, and optimum product diversity," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 953-963, October.
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    9. Andrew Sweeting, 2005. "Coordination Games, Multiple Equilibria and the Timing of Radio Commercials," 2005 Meeting Papers 490, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pim Heijnen, 2009. "On the probability of breakdown in participation games," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 32(3), pages 493-511, March.
    2. Shimizu, Hiroshi & Wakutsu, Naohiko, 2014. "Entrepreneurial Spin-Outs and Vanishing Technological Trajectory: Laser Diodes in the U.S. and Japan," IIR Working Paper 13-21, Institute of Innovation Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Pietro Dindo & Jan Tuinstra, 2011. "A Class of Evolutionary Models for Participation Games with Negative Feedback," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 37(3), pages 267-300, March.
    4. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:1:p:319-338 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Frank, Joshua & Sohn, Saeyoon, 2011. "A behavioral economic analysis of excess entry in arts labor markets," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 265-273, May.
    6. Schultz, Christian, 2009. "Transparency and product variety," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 165-168, March.
    7. Federico Ciliberto & Zhou Zhang, 2017. "Multiple Equilibria And Deterrence In Airline Markets," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 319-338, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    common property resource problem; comparative statics; coordination; market entry; mixed strategy equilibrium; Nash equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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