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Improving U.S. Monetary Policy Communications

Author

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  • Cecchetti, Stephen G
  • Schoenholtz, Kermit

Abstract

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) publishes vast amounts of information regarding monetary policy, including its goals, strategy and outlook. By reinforcing the commitment to price stability and maximum sustainable employment, this transparency has helped improve U.S. economic performance in recent decades. Based on two dozen interviews with policy experts, we identify three objectives that guide our search for further improvements in communications practices: simplifying public statements, clarifying how policy will react to changing conditions, and highlighting uncertainty and risks. As examples, we propose a simpler post-meeting policy statement and the introduction of a concise Report on Economic Projections, the elements of which are mostly available in existing publications. A broader, systematic application of these objectives could also help the FOMC streamline other aspects of its communications framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Cecchetti, Stephen G & Schoenholtz, Kermit, 2019. "Improving U.S. Monetary Policy Communications," CEPR Discussion Papers 13915, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13915
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    central bank accountability; central bank communication; Federal Reserve; forward guidance; monetary policy; Monetary policy credibility; Policy Transparency; Reaction functions;

    JEL classification:

    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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