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Land Trade and Development: A Market Design Approach

Listed author(s):
  • Bryan, Gharad
  • de Quidt, Jonathan
  • Wilkening, Tom
  • Yadav, Nitin

Small farms and fragmented plots are hallmarks of agriculture in less-developed coun- tries, and there is evidence of high returns to land consolidation and reallocation. Complementarities, holdout and asymmetric information mean that private trade will be slow to reallocate land, and imply that market design has the potential to contribute to the development process. Complexity concerns are, however, paramount. We present results from a framed field experiment with Kenyan farmers, comparing the performance of several continuous-time land exchanges. Farmers are able to achieve high degrees of efficiency, and to comprehend and gain from a relatively com- plicated package exchange.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 12136.

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Date of creation: Jul 2017
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12136
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  1. Nejat Anbarci & Nick Feltovich, 2013. "How sensitive are bargaining outcomes to changes in disagreement payoffs?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(4), pages 560-596, December.
  2. Geoffroy de Clippel & Kareen Rozen, 2013. "Fairness through the Lens of Cooperative Game Theory: An Experimental Approach," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1925, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  3. Milgrom,Paul, 2004. "Putting Auction Theory to Work," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521536721, March.
  4. Deininger, Klaus & Monchuk, Daniel & Nagarajan, Hari K & Singh, Sudhir K, 2014. "Does land fragmentation increase the cost of cultivation ? evidence from India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7085, The World Bank.
  5. S.J. Rassenti & V.L. Smith & R.L. Bulfin, 1982. "A Combinatorial Auction Mechanism for Airport Time Slot Allocation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 13(2), pages 402-417, Autumn.
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