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Land Trade and Development: A Market Design Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Bryan, Gharad
  • de Quidt, Jonathan
  • Wilkening, Tom
  • Yadav, Nitin

Abstract

Small farms and fragmented plots are hallmarks of agriculture in less-developed coun- tries, and there is evidence of high returns to land consolidation and reallocation. Complementarities, holdout and asymmetric information mean that private trade will be slow to reallocate land, and imply that market design has the potential to contribute to the development process. Complexity concerns are, however, paramount. We present results from a framed field experiment with Kenyan farmers, comparing the performance of several continuous-time land exchanges. Farmers are able to achieve high degrees of efficiency, and to comprehend and gain from a relatively com- plicated package exchange.

Suggested Citation

  • Bryan, Gharad & de Quidt, Jonathan & Wilkening, Tom & Yadav, Nitin, 2017. "Land Trade and Development: A Market Design Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 12136, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12136
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nejat Anbarci & Nick Feltovich, 2013. "How sensitive are bargaining outcomes to changes in disagreement payoffs?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 16(4), pages 560-596, December.
    2. Geoffroy de Clippel & Kareen Rozen, 2013. "Fairness through the Lens of Cooperative Game Theory: An Experimental Approach," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1925, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    3. repec:taf:jdevst:v:53:y:2017:i:1:p:82-98 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Milgrom,Paul, 2004. "Putting Auction Theory to Work," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521536721, March.
    5. Klaus Deininger & Daniel Monchuk & Hari K Nagarajan & Sudhir K Singh, 2017. "Does Land Fragmentation Increase the Cost of Cultivation? Evidence from India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(1), pages 82-98, January.
    6. S.J. Rassenti & V.L. Smith & R.L. Bulfin, 1982. "A Combinatorial Auction Mechanism for Airport Time Slot Allocation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 13(2), pages 402-417, Autumn.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:oxford:v:33:y:2017:i:4:p:541-571. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Scott Kominers & Alexander Teytelboym & Vincent Crawford, 2017. "An Invitation to Market Design," Working Papers 2017-069, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D47 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Market Design
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment

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