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Can Referral Improve Targeting? Evidence from a Vocational Training Experiment

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Listed:
  • Fafchamps, Marcel
  • Islam, Asadul
  • Malek, Abdul
  • Pakrashi, Debayan

Abstract

We seek to improve the targeting of vocational training by inviting past trainees to select future trainees from a candidate pool. Some referees are rewarded or incentivized. Training increases the adoption of recommended practices and improves performance on average, but not all trainees adopt. Referred trainees are 3.7% more likely to adopt, but rewarding or incentivizing referees does not improve referral quality. When referees receive financial compensation, average adoption increases and referee and referred are more likely to coordinate their adoption behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Fafchamps, Marcel & Islam, Asadul & Malek, Abdul & Pakrashi, Debayan, 2017. "Can Referral Improve Targeting? Evidence from a Vocational Training Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 12070, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12070
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sinha, Shekhar Kumar & Talati, Jayesh, 2007. "Productivity impacts of the system of rice intensification (SRI): A case study in West Bengal, India," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 55-60, January.
    2. Kazushi Takahashi & Christopher B. Barrett, 2014. "The System of Rice Intensification and its Impacts on Household Income and Child Schooling: Evidence from Rural Indonesia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(1), pages 269-289.
    3. Christopher B. Barrett & Christine M. Moser & Oloro V. McHugh & Joeli Barison, 2004. "Better Technology, Better Plots, or Better Farmers? Identifying Changes in Productivity and Risk among Malagasy Rice Farmers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(4), pages 869-888.
    4. Christine M. Moser & Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "The complex dynamics of smallholder technology adoption: the case of SRI in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 373-388, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    agricultural innovation; extension; Social Networks; targeting;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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