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Violence and Birth Outcomes: Evidence from Homicides in Brazil

Author

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  • Koppensteiner, Martin
  • Manacorda, Marco

Abstract

This paper uses microdata from Brazilian vital statistics on births and deaths between 2000 and 2010 to estimate the impact of in-utero exposure to local violence - measured by homicide rates - on birth outcomes. The estimates show that exposure to violence during the first trimester of pregnancy leads to a small but precisely estimated increase in the risk of low birthweight and prematurity. Effects are found both in small municipalities, where homicides are rare, and in large municipalities, where violence is endemic, and are particularly pronounced among children of poorly educated mothers, implying that violence compounds the disadvantage that these children already suffer as a result of their households' lower socioeconomic status.

Suggested Citation

  • Koppensteiner, Martin & Manacorda, Marco, 2016. "Violence and Birth Outcomes: Evidence from Homicides in Brazil," CEPR Discussion Papers 11279, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11279
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Paul, Alexander & Reinhold, Steffen, 2018. "Economic Conditions, Parental Employment and Health of Newborns," IZA Discussion Papers 11338, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Dominic P. Parker & Jeremy D. Foltz & David Elsea, 2016. "Unintended consequences of economic sanctions for human rights Conflict minerals and infant mortality in the Democratic Republic of the Congo," WIDER Working Paper Series 124, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. repec:eee:jhecon:v:59:y:2018:i:c:p:153-177 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Birth Outcomes; Birthweight; Brazil.; Homicides; Stress;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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