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Corporate Culture, Societal Culture, and Institutions

Author

Listed:
  • Guiso, Luigi
  • Sapienza, Paola
  • Zingales, Luigi

Abstract

While both cultural and legal norms (institutions) help foster cooperation, culture is the more primitive of the two and itself sustains formal institutions. Cultural changes are rarer and slower than changes in legal institutions, which makes it difficult to identify the role played by culture. Cultural changes and their effects are easier to identify in simpler, more controlled, environments, such as corporations. Corporate culture, thus, is not only interesting per se, but also as a laboratory to study the role of societal culture and the way it can be changed.

Suggested Citation

  • Guiso, Luigi & Sapienza, Paola & Zingales, Luigi, 2015. "Corporate Culture, Societal Culture, and Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 10424, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10424
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yann Algan & Pierre Cahuc, 2010. "Inherited Trust and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2060-2092, December.
    2. Giampaolo Lecce & Laura Ogliari, 2015. "Institutional Transplant and Cultural Proximity: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia," CESifo Working Paper Series 5652, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Stefan Bender & Nicholas Bloom & David Card & John Van Reenen & Stefanie Wolter, 2018. "Management Practices, Workforce Selection, and Productivity," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(S1), pages 371-409.
    4. repec:eee:corfin:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:320-341 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10668-016-9857-9 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corporate culture; cultural economics; institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • K4 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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