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Collateralisation bubbles when investors disagree about risk

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  • Broer, Tobias
  • Kero, Afroditi

Abstract

Survey respondents strongly disagree about return risks and, increasingly, macroeconomic uncertainty. This may have contributed to higher asset prices through increased use of collateralisation, which allows risk-neutral investors to realise perceived gains from trade. Investors with lower risk perceptions buy collateralised loans, whose downside-risk they perceive as small. Investors with higher risk perceptions buy upside-risk through asset purchase and collateralised loan issuance, raising prices. More complex collateralised contracts, like CDOs, can increase prices further. In contrast, with disagreement about mean payoffs, price bubbles arise without collateralisation, which may discipline prices as pessimists demand higher returns on risky loans.

Suggested Citation

  • Broer, Tobias & Kero, Afroditi, 2014. "Collateralisation bubbles when investors disagree about risk," CEPR Discussion Papers 10148, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10148
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jfinec:v:127:y:2018:i:3:p:505-518 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Broer, Tobias, 2016. "Securitisation Bubbles: Structured finance with disagreement about default correlations," CEPR Discussion Papers 11145, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    asset prices; bubbles; disagreement; heterogeneous beliefs; volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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