IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cpb/discus/232.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How Large was the Credit Crunch in the OECD?

Author

Listed:
  • Michiel Bijlsma

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Andrei Dubovik

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Bas Straathof

    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

Abstract

Reduced credit supply in the years 2008 and 2009 should have resulted in lower growth in industries that are more dependent on external finance. This effect should have been stronger in countries with a more prominent and/or more leveraged financial system. We focus on the OECD countries and, controlling for omitted variables, find robust empirical support for both hypotheses. We estimate that the credit crunch reduced the industrial growth rate by 5.5 percentage points in 2008 and by 21 percentage points in 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Michiel Bijlsma & Andrei Dubovik & Bas Straathof, 2013. "How Large was the Credit Crunch in the OECD?," CPB Discussion Paper 232, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:232
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cpb.nl/sites/default/files/publicaties/download/cpb-discussion-paper-232-how-large-was-credit-crunch-oecd.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.cpb.nl/sites/default/files/publicaties/download/cpb-discussion-paper-232-how-large-was-credit-crunch-oecd_0.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-558, June.
    2. Rajan, Raghuram G & Zingales, Luigi, 1998. "Financial Dependence and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 559-586, June.
    3. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.), Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084 Central Bank of Chile.
    4. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
    5. Beck, Thorsten & Levine, Ross & Loayza, Norman, 2000. "Finance and the sources of growth," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1-2), pages 261-300.
    6. Beltratti, Andrea & Stulz, René M., 2012. "The credit crisis around the globe: Why did some banks perform better?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 1-17.
    7. Matías Braun & Borja Larrain, 2005. "Finance and the Business Cycle: International, Inter-Industry Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(3), pages 1097-1128, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Duchi, Fabio & Elbourne, Adam, 2016. "Credit supply shocks in the Netherlands," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 51-71.
    2. Michiel Bijlsma & Andrei Dubovik, 2014. "Banks, Financial Markets and Growth in Developed Countries: a Survey of the empirical literature," CPB Discussion Paper 266, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. Haltenhof, Samuel & Jung Lee, Seung & Stebunovs, Viktors, 2014. "The credit crunch and fall in employment during the Great Recession," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 31-57.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:232. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cpbgvnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.