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When Modellers Behave Like Lawyers: Have we Lost The Plot?

Australia has made outstanding contributions to the use of quantitative economic models in public policy discussions. That leading role is now threatened by the increasing use of econometric modellers in an advocacy, lawyer-like role, rather than as impartial sources of the best available technical advice. This development became inevitable once it became fashionable in Canberra during the mid 1980s to deny the existence of public goods and to force the funding of economic intelligence garnering increasingly into the private sector. This paper argues that we are all the losers.

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Paper provided by Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre in its series Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers with number g-125.

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Date of creation: Jan 1998
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Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-125
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  1. Powell, Alan A. & Snape, Richard H., 1993. "The contribution of applied general equilibrium analysis to policy reform in Australia," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 393-414, August.
  2. Wallis, K.F., 1992. "On Macroeconomic Policy and Macroeconometric Models," CEPR Discussion Papers 264, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Wallis, Kenneth F, 1993. "Comparing Macroeconometric Models: A Review Article," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 60(238), pages 225-37, May.
  4. Hertel, Thomas, . "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books 7685, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  5. Harrison, W Jill & Pearson, K R, 1996. "Computing Solutions for Large General Equilibrium Models Using GEMPACK," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 83-127, May.
  6. Adams, Philip D. & Dixon, Peter B. & McDonald, Daina & Meagher, G. A. & Parmenter, Brian R., 1994. "Forecasts for the Australian economy using the MONASH model," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 557-571, December.
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