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Colonial Mestizaje and its Consequences for Human Capital and Early Twentieth Century Regional Industrialization in Colombia

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  • Irina Rosa España E

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  • Irina Rosa España E. y Fabio Sánchez T.

Abstract

This paper quantitatively shows that the 1945 regional differences in the degree of development of manufacturing industry are explained by human capital accumulation prior to industrial development. Human capital accumulation was more intense in the regions with higher presence of non white free population - the Free of all Colors" caste - at the end of the colonial times. Once the country began industrializing at the beginning of the twentieth century the former "Free of all Colors" regions were better prepared to adapt and to use the industrial technology and hence manufacturing industry rose with greater strength in those regions. "

Suggested Citation

  • Irina Rosa España E & Irina Rosa España E. y Fabio Sánchez T., 2012. "Colonial Mestizaje and its Consequences for Human Capital and Early Twentieth Century Regional Industrialization in Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 010015, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:010015
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    File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2012-21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Industrialization; human capital; coffee; gold; foreign crises; free population.;

    JEL classification:

    • N36 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N66 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N96 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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