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Third Country Effect of Migration: the Trade-Migration Nexus Revisited

Author

Listed:
  • Erik Figueiredo
  • Luiz Renato Lima
  • Gianluca Orefice

Abstract

This paper proposes a new channel through which migrants can affect the import demand of the host country. In migrating from origin to destination country, migrants observe a change in the prices of the bundle of consumable goods. In particular, the migration decision can reflect a reduction in the price of imported goods (due to lower applied tariff) for the consumption bundle of migrants: emigration towards less (tariff) protected countries allows the consumption of products that were prohibitively protected in the origin countries of migrants. To test this channel we estimate the import demand effect of migrant groups coming from third high (tariff) protected countries. We use a theory-grounded gravity estimations and a fresh econometric techniques able to address both the zero migration flows problem and the endogeneity of migrants. Our results suggest that such a third-country immigrant effect is significant and positive.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Figueiredo & Luiz Renato Lima & Gianluca Orefice, 2016. "Third Country Effect of Migration: the Trade-Migration Nexus Revisited," Working Papers 2016-22, CEPII research center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2016-22
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    File URL: http://www.cepii.fr/PDF_PUB/wp/2016/wp2016-22.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James A. Dunlevy, 2006. "The Influence of Corruption and Language on the Protrade Effect of Immigrants: Evidence from the American States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 182-186, February.
    2. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    3. Felbermayr, Gabriel J. & Jung, Benjamin, 2009. "The pro-trade effect of the brain drain: Sorting out confounding factors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 72-75, August.
    4. Antoine Berthou & Lionel Fontagné, 2016. "Variable Trade Costs, Composition Effects and the Intensive Margin of Trade," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(1), pages 54-71, January.
    5. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    6. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Lafourcade, Miren & Mayer, Thierry, 2005. "The trade-creating effects of business and social networks: evidence from France," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 1-29, May.
    7. David Card, 2009. "Immigration and Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 1-21, May.
    8. Ivan A. Canay, 2011. "A simple approach to quantile regression for panel data," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 14(3), pages 368-386, October.
    9. Felbermayr, Gabriel J. & Toubal, Farid, 2012. "Revisiting the Trade-Migration Nexus: Evidence from New OECD Data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 928-937.
    10. Chernozhukov, Victor & Hansen, Christian, 2008. "Instrumental variable quantile regression: A robust inference approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 379-398, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade-Migration; Third-Country Effect; Quantile Regression; Imputation;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

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