IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/chy/respap/133cherp.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Delayed discharges and hospital type: Evidence from the English NHS

Author

Listed:
  • James Gaughan

    (Economics of Social and Health Care Research Unit, Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK)

  • Hugh Gravelle

    (Economics of Social and Health Care Research Unit, Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK)

  • Luigi Siciliani

    (Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, UK)

Abstract

Delayed discharges of patients from hospital, commonly known as bed-blocking, is a long standing policy concern. Delays can increase the overall cost of treatment and may worsen patient outcomes. We investigate how delayed discharges vary by hospital type (Acute, Specialist, Mental Health, Teaching), and the extent to which such differences can be explained by demography, casemix, the availability of long-term care and hospital governance as reflected in whether the hospital has Foundation Trust status, which gives greater financial autonomy and flexibility in staffing and pay. We use a new panel database of delays in all English NHS hospital Trusts from 2011/12 to 2013/14. Employing count data models, we find that a greater local supply of long-term care (care home beds) is associated with fewer delays. Hospitals which are Foundation Trusts have fewer delayed discharges and might therefore be used as exemplars of good practice in managing delays. Mental Health Trusts have more delayed discharges than Acute Trusts but a smaller proportion of them are attributed to the NHS, possibly indicating a relatively greater lack of adequate community care for mental health patients.

Suggested Citation

  • James Gaughan & Hugh Gravelle & Luigi Siciliani, 2016. "Delayed discharges and hospital type: Evidence from the English NHS," Working Papers 133cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:133cherp
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/che/documents/papers/researchpapers/CHERP133_discharges_hospital_NHS.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2016
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rossella Verzulli & Rowena Jacobs & Maria Goddard, 2011. "Do hospitals respond to greater autonomy? Evidence from the English NHS," Working Papers 064cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    2. James Gaughan & Hugh Gravelle & Luigi Siciliani, 2014. "Testing the bed-blocking hypothesis: does higher supply of nursing and care homes reduce delayed hospital discharges?," Working Papers 102cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    3. Kolstad, Jonathan T. & Kowalski, Amanda E., 2012. "The impact of health care reform on hospital and preventive care: Evidence from Massachusetts," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 909-929.
    4. Cameron, A Colin & Trivedi, Pravin K, 1986. "Econometric Models Based on Count Data: Comparisons and Applications of Some Estimators and Tests," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(1), pages 29-53, January.
    5. de Meijer, Claudine & Koopmanschap, Marc & d' Uva, Teresa Bago & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2011. "Determinants of long-term care spending: Age, time to death or disability?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 425-438, March.
    6. Kuhn, Michael & Nuscheler, Robert, 2011. "Optimal public provision of nursing homes and the role of information," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 795-810, July.
    7. Julien Forder, 2009. "Long-term care and hospital utilisation by older people: an analysis of substitution rates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(11), pages 1322-1338.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:chy:respap:133cherp. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gill Forder). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/chyoruk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.