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Investigating the relationship between social care supply and healthcare utilization by older people in England

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  • Dan Liu
  • Maria Lucia Pace
  • Maria Goddard
  • Rowena Jacobs
  • Raphael Wittenberg
  • Anne Mason

Abstract

Since 2010, adult social care spending in England has fallen significantly in real terms whilst demand has risen. Reductions in social care supply may also have impacted demand for NHS services, particularly for those whose care is provided at the interface of the health and care systems. We analyzed a panel dataset of 150 local authorities (councils) to test potential impacts on hospital utilization by people aged 65 and over: emergency admission rates for falls and hip fractures (“front‐door” measures); and extended stays of 7 days or longer; and 21 days or longer (“back‐door” measures). Changes in social care supply were assessed in two ways: gross current expenditure (per capita 65 and over) adjusted by local labor costs and social care workforce (per capita 18 and over). We ran negative binomial models, controlling for deprivation, ethnicity, age, unpaid care, council class, and year effects. To account for potential endogeneity, we ran instrumental variable regressions and dynamic panel models. Sensitivity analysis explored potential effects of funding for integrated care (the Better Care Fund). There was no consistent evidence that councils with higher per capita spend or higher social care staffing rates had lower hospital admission rates or shorter hospital stays.

Suggested Citation

  • Dan Liu & Maria Lucia Pace & Maria Goddard & Rowena Jacobs & Raphael Wittenberg & Anne Mason, 2021. "Investigating the relationship between social care supply and healthcare utilization by older people in England," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(1), pages 36-54, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:30:y:2021:i:1:p:36-54
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.4175
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    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 4th January 2021
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2021-01-04 12:00:05

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    2. Manuel Serrano-Alarcón & Helena Hernández-Pizarro & Guillem López i Casasnovas & Catia Nicodemo, 2021. "The effect of Long-Term Care (LTC) benefits on healthcare use," Working Papers 2021-12, FEDEA.

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