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Female empowerment and education of children in Nepal

Author

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  • Magnus Hatlebakk
  • Yogendra B. Gurung

Abstract

A family survey was conducted in Nepal to investigate whether female empowerment leads to more education, in particular for girls. The relative economic power of the male and female side of the extended family was used as an instrument for female empowerment. The findings indicate, however, that both female empowerment and relative economic power affect education. There is a positive association between female empowerment and children’s education for both gender, while boys are prioritized if the male side of the family is economically weak.

Suggested Citation

  • Magnus Hatlebakk & Yogendra B. Gurung, 2014. "Female empowerment and education of children in Nepal," CMI Working Papers 7, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
  • Handle: RePEc:chm:wpaper:wp2014-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lixing Li & Xiaoyu Wu, 2011. "Gender of Children, Bargaining Power, and Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 295-316.
    2. Kaushik Basu, 2006. "Gender and Say: a Model of Household Behaviour with Endogenously Determined Balance of Power," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(511), pages 558-580, April.
    3. Deininger, Klaus & Goyal, Aparajita & Nagarajan, Hari, 2010. "Inheritance law reform and women's access to capital : evidence from India's Hindu succession act," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5338, The World Bank.
    4. Magnus Hatlebakk, 2017. "Son Preference, Number of Children, Education and Occupational Choice in Rural Nepal," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 1-20, February.
    5. Doss, Cheryl, 2013. "Intrahousehold bargaining and resource allocation in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6337, The World Bank.
    6. Anderson, Siwan & Eswaran, Mukesh, 2009. "What determines female autonomy? Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 179-191, November.
    7. Nancy Qian, 2008. "Missing Women and the Price of Tea in China: The Effect of Sex-Specific Earnings on Sex Imbalance," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(3), pages 1251-1285.
    8. Cheryl Doss, 2013. "Intrahousehold Bargaining and Resource Allocation in Developing Countries-super-1," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 28(1), pages 52-78, February.
    9. Marcel Fafchamps & Bereket Kebede & Agnes R. Quisumbing, 2009. "Intrahousehold Welfare in Rural Ethiopia," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(4), pages 567-599, August.
    10. Marcos A. Rangel, 2006. "Alimony Rights and Intrahousehold Allocation of Resources: Evidence from Brazil," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(513), pages 627-658, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Loos, T. & Sariyev, O. & Zeller, M., 2018. "The effect of gendered decision-making considering all household members on the adoption of crop rotation and livelihood outcomes in Ethiopia," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277120, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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    Keywords

    Education; Intrahousehold; Female autonomy;

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