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Son-preference, number of children, education and occupational choice in rural Nepal

  • Magnus Hatlebakk

A unique family survey was conducted in Nepal to investigate the economic consequences of having a first-born girl. Women get more children, but we find no causal effect of number of children on economic outcomes. But independently of the number of children there is a positive effect on boys' education of having a first born sister, who presumably takes care of household work so the boys can focus on school. This indicates a stronger son-preference in Nepal than what is found in studies from neighboring countries.

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Paper provided by CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway in its series CMI Working Papers with number 8.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chm:wpaper:wp2012-8
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  1. Masako Ota & Peter Moffatt, 2007. "The within-household schooling decision: a study of children in rural Andhra Pradesh," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 223-239, February.
  2. Magnus Hatlebakk, 2009. "Capacity-constrained Collusive Price Discrimination in the Informal Rural Credit Markets of Nepal," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 70-86, 02.
  3. Vladimir Ponczek & Andre Portela Souza, 2012. "New Evidence of the Causal Effect of Family Size on Child Quality in a Developing Country," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(1), pages 64-106.
  4. Das Gupta, Monica & Jiang Zhenghua & Li Bohua & Xie Zhenming & Woojin Chung & Bae Hwa-Ok, 2002. "Why is son preference so persistent in East and South Asia? a cross-country study of China, India, and the Republic of Korea," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2942, The World Bank.
  5. Njård Håkon Gudbrandsen, 2010. "The impact of wealth and female autonomy on fertility decisions in Nepal: An econometric analysis," CMI Working Papers 1, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
  6. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
  7. Ben-Porath, Yoram & Welch, Finis, 1976. "Do Sex Preferences Really Matter?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 285-307, May.
  8. Deepankar Basu & Robert Jong, 2010. "Son targeting fertility behavior: Some consequences and determinants," Demography, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 521-536, May.
  9. Daouli, Joan & Demoussis, Michael & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2009. "Sibling-sex composition and its effects on fertility and labor supply of Greek mothers," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 189-191, March.
  10. Sawada, Yasuyuki & Lokshin, Michael, 2009. "Obstacles to school progression in rural Pakistan: An analysis of gender and sibling rivalry using field survey data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 335-347, March.
  11. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser, 2010. "Multiple Experiments for the Causal Link between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(4), pages 773-824, October.
  12. Jacques Véron, 2008. "The demography of South Asia from the 1950s to the 2000s. A summary of changes and a statistical assessment," Population (english edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 63(1), pages 9-89.
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