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Community Origins of Industrial Entrepreneurship in Pre-Independence India

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Listed:
  • Gupta, Bishnupriya

    (University of Warwick)

  • Mookherjee, Dilip

    (Boston University)

  • Munshi, Kaivan

    (University of Cambridge)

  • Sanclemente, Mario

    (University of Warwick)

Abstract

We argue that community networks played an important role in the emergence of Indian entrepreneurship in the early stages of the cotton textile and jute textile industries in the late 19th and early 20th century respectively, overcoming the lack of market institutions and government support. From business registers, we construct a yearly panel dataset of entrepreneurs in these two industries. We find no evidence that entry is affected by prior trading experience or price shocks in the corresponding upstream sector. Firm directors exhibited a high degree of clustering of entrepreneurs by community. The dynamics of entry is consistent with a model of network-based dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Gupta, Bishnupriya & Mookherjee, Dilip & Munshi, Kaivan & Sanclemente, Mario, 2019. "Community Origins of Industrial Entrepreneurship in Pre-Independence India," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 402, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:402
    as

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    File URL: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/centres/cage/manage/publications/402-2019_gupta.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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