IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ces/ceswps/_6342.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Energy Price Reform: A Guide for Policymakers

Author

Listed:
  • David Coady
  • Ian Parry
  • Baoping Shang

Abstract

This essay reviews the conceptual and quantitative literature on the efficient system of fossil fuel energy prices in different countries for reflecting supply and environmental costs, as well as the environmental, fiscal, and economic benefits from energy price reform. Drawing on recent experiences in numerous countries, the ingredients for successful reform are then discussed (e.g., the need for a comprehensive reform strategy and for compensating vulnerable groups). Low energy prices, fiscal pressures, and momentum for climate action provide an especially conducive environment for price reform and much is happening rapidly on the ground, however there is a long way to go to reap the enormous benefits at stake (e.g., at the global level, over a 20 percent reduction in carbon emissions and revenues gains of 4 percent of GDP).

Suggested Citation

  • David Coady & Ian Parry & Baoping Shang, 2017. "Energy Price Reform: A Guide for Policymakers," CESifo Working Paper Series 6342, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6342
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp6342.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mr. David Coady & Baoping Shang & Louis Sears & Ian W.H. Parry, 2015. "How Large Are Global Energy Subsidies?," IMF Working Papers 2015/105, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Parry, Ian W. H. & Bento, Antonio M., 2000. "Tax Deductions, Environmental Policy, and the "Double Dividend" Hypothesis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 67-96, January.
    3. Vivien Foster & Cecilia Briceno-Garmendia, 2010. "Africa's Infrastructure : A Time for Transformation [Infrastructures africaines]," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2692, July.
    4. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Supply-Side Economics: An Analytical Review," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(2), pages 293-316, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. World Bank Group, 2018. "Commodity Markets Outlook, April 2018," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 29721, July.
    2. Shmelev, Stanislav E. & Speck, Stefan U., 2018. "Green fiscal reform in Sweden: Econometric assessment of the carbon and energy taxation scheme," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 969-981.
    3. Lucas W. Davis & James M. Sallee, 2020. "Should Electric Vehicle Drivers Pay a Mileage Tax?," Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 65-94.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Parry, Ian W. H., 2004. "Are emissions permits regressive?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 364-387, March.
    2. Parry, Ian W.H., 2002. "Adjusting Carbon Cost Analyses to Account for Prior Tax Distortions," Discussion Papers 10481, Resources for the Future.
    3. Ian Parry, 2016. "Reflections on the International Coordination of Carbon Pricing," CESifo Working Paper Series 5975, CESifo.
    4. Ian W. H. Parry, 2003. "Fiscal Interactions and the Case for Carbon Taxes Over Grandfathered Carbon Permits," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 385-399.
    5. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 2002. "Political economics and public finance," Handbook of Public Economics, in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 24, pages 1549-1659, Elsevier.
    6. Aleksandar Vasilev, 2015. "Welfare gains from the adoption of proportional taxation in a general-equilibrium model with a grey economy: the case of Bulgaria’s 2008 flat tax reform," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 169-185, May.
    7. Röhrs, Sigrid & Winter, Christoph, 2017. "Reducing government debt in the presence of inequality," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 1-20.
    8. Lin, Shuanglin, 2008. "China's value-added tax reform, capital accumulation, and welfare implications," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 197-214, June.
    9. Espino, Emilio & González Rozada, Martín, 2013. "Normative Fiscal Policy and Growth: Some Quantitative Implications for the Chilean Economy," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4648, Inter-American Development Bank.
    10. Buiter, Willem H., 1996. "Aspects of Fiscal Performance in some Transition Economies under Fund-supported Programs," CEPR Discussion Papers 1535, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Schünemann, Johannes & Trimborn, Timo, 2017. "Boosting taxes for boasting about houses: Status concerns in the housing market," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 05/2017, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
    12. Freddy Heylen & Renaat Van de Kerckhove, 2014. "Heterogeneous ability and the effects of fiscal policy on employment, income and welfare in general equilibrium," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 14/898, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    13. Burke, Paul J. & Yang, Hewen, 2016. "The price and income elasticities of natural gas demand: International evidence," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 466-474.
    14. Torsten Ehlers, 2014. "Understanding the challenges for infrastructure finance," BIS Working Papers 454, Bank for International Settlements.
    15. Stephen Younger, 2016. "The Impact of Reforming Energy Subsidies, Cash Transfers, and Taxes on Inequality and Poverty in Ghana and Tanzania," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 1355, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    16. Duranton, Gilles & Venables, Anthony J, 2018. "Place-Based Policies for Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 12889, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Jana Hönke & Ivan Cuesta-Fernandez, 2018. "Mobilising security and logistics through an African port: A controversies approach to infrastructure," Mobilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 246-260, March.
    18. Lucia de Strasser, 2017. "Calling for Nexus Thinking in Africa’s Energy Planning," ESP: Energy Scenarios and Policy 263161, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    19. Julie Anne Cronin & Don Fullerton & Steven Sexton, 2019. "Vertical and Horizontal Redistributions from a Carbon Tax and Rebate," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(S1), pages 169-208.
    20. Alexander Pfeiffer & Cameron Hepburn, 2016. "Facing the Challenge of Climate Change," Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies, Emerging Markets Forum, vol. 8(2), pages 201-215, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    energy price reform; efficient taxation; environmental externalities; reform experiences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q35 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Hydrocarbon Resources
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6342. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Klaus Wohlrabe (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.